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IXVolt 08-20-2012 05:13 PM

Blackberry Wine
 
5 Attachment(s)
Made my second batch of wine yesterday. Just thought I would throw some pictures up.

24lbs of blackberry's.

Used SWMBO's squeezo (http://www.amazon.com/Squeezo-Strainer/dp/B0015QH3L2)

Which worked AWESOME.

I got 2 gallons of pure blackberry juice/syrup. Measured gravity with ratio to get my 5 gallons. Added 10lbs of sugar, mixed and measured gravity again.

I forgot to compensate for the mass of the sugar (second time I've done this) so I ended up with closer to 6 gallons of must. (Is it wine when I add the yeast or is it still must?)

Added nutrient, pectic enzyme, acid blend, campden tablets and let it sit for about 24 hours.

Pitched the yeast and now we wait and hope I don't have to clean up a mess.

Question, why do so many recipes say to wait 24 hours before pitching? Is this temperature related, letting the must cool down? Or does the campden tablets need time to sulfate?

Yooper 08-20-2012 06:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IXVolt (Post 4346388)
Question, why do so many recipes say to wait 24 hours before pitching? Is this temperature related, letting the must cool down? Or does the campden tablets need time to sulfate?

If you add campden, you generally wait 24 hours before adding the yeast as to not "stun" the yeast. Wine yeast is very tolerant of sulfites (not sulfate) but giving it 24 hours to dissipate a bit is commonly done just to make sure the yeast are not going to be stunned by the sulfites (campden).

Another weird addition is pectic enzyme. It works best when not added with yeast, and not added with the sulfites. So when I make blackberry wine, I add the sulfites when I mix up the must. Twelve hours later, I add the pectic enzyme. Twelve hours after that, I add the yeast. Once you add the yeast, it's considered 'wine' and not 'must' any more.

IXVolt 08-20-2012 07:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yooper (Post 4346621)
If you add campden, you generally wait 24 hours before adding the yeast as to not "stun" the yeast. Wine yeast is very tolerant of sulfites (not sulfate) but giving it 24 hours to dissipate a bit is commonly done just to make sure the yeast are not going to be stunned by the sulfites (campden).

Another weird addition is pectic enzyme. It works best when not added with yeast, and not added with the sulfites. So when I make blackberry wine, I add the sulfites when I mix up the must. Twelve hours later, I add the pectic enzyme. Twelve hours after that, I add the yeast. Once you add the yeast, it's considered 'wine' and not 'must' any more.

Thanks for clearing that up.

I guess next time I'll space the additions out more. The yeast is happy and going to town now.

Another question, when you oak, does it change the flavor much? I'm going to be making this a dry wine, I'm not a big fan of sweet wines. So wondering how well this blends with oak.

Yooper 08-20-2012 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IXVolt (Post 4346663)
Thanks for clearing that up.

I guess next time I'll space the additions out more. The yeast is happy and going to town now.

Another question, when you oak, does it change the flavor much? I'm going to be making this a dry wine, I'm not a big fan of sweet wines. So wondering how well this blends with oak.

I like my blackberry wine oaked. I always make mine dry. The key is to make a medium bodied or heavier wine- the lighter fruit wines can't hold up well to the tannins in oak. I use medium toast chips, and oak for about 1 month. I usually don't use too much oak- and instead just add more if it's not enough as you can always add more but you can't take it out! Usually 2 ounces for 5 gallons is enough.

Oak brings great flavors to wine- not just "oaky" flavors but hints of vanilla and tannins along with it. It makes the wine richer and deeper.

IXVolt 08-20-2012 11:15 PM

In that case I'll try 1 oz for this 5 gal. If I like it, next year I might up it a bit more. I didn't know other flavors could be imparted from oak. Cool!

Yooper 08-21-2012 12:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IXVolt (Post 4347377)
In that case I'll try 1 oz for this 5 gal. If I like it, next year I might up it a bit more. I didn't know other flavors could be imparted from oak. Cool!

If you want more "vanilla" hints, you could use light toast oak. If you want more tannin, you could use dark toast. I tend to use medium for most wines, but for my big bold dark chokecherry wine, I use Hungarian oak, and it's really dark and heavy. Even oaking has some options!

Subsailor 08-21-2012 12:27 AM

We don't get blackberries up here, I sure do miss them. Lot and Lots of raspberries and other sorts. Right now we have a major load of highbush cranberries and wild red currants.

inhousebrew 08-21-2012 01:25 AM

I just finished fermenting my first batch of blackberry wine. Excited for these two gallons although not entirely sure what to expect.

goosen1 08-21-2012 01:34 AM

I just racked my blackberry out of the secondary. I'm still debating if I should throw in a lightly toasted oak spiral in it??

Turnerdude1 08-21-2012 02:14 AM

Here in Winston-Salem N.C. it April in went down to 26 deg. for about one hour just enough to wipeout 80% of the blackberry crop. Quess we will get it down next year.


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