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Old 01-11-2013, 03:44 AM   #11
novalou
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridenour64
I just transferred my wine into my better bottle. And looking closer at my bucket, there are a ton of scratches which is crazy because I stirred in a pot and when I mixed I didn't hit the sides at all? Do most experienced brewers still do primary In buckets or just a bigger carboy?

I'm debating just buying a 6.5 glass carboy and a 6 gal glass carboy to avoid scratches. Will a glass carboy scratch when stirring bentonite or other ingredients?

This is kind of frustrating because I just paid 75$ for this kit and I'm thinking I shoulda just bought glass.
I primary ferment mainly in plastic buckets. If the scratches become stained, then replace, they don't last forever. I have done juice in a larger carboy, but it is useful to have buckets.
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:48 AM   #12
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So I can still use the bucket even with scratches? As long as I clean and sanitize well? I was just worried that my money went down the drain after only one use.

This stuff isn't as easy as I thought it would be.

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Old 01-11-2013, 07:40 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridenour64
So I can still use the bucket even with scratches? As long as I clean and sanitize well? I was just worried that my money went down the drain after only one use.

This stuff isn't as easy as I thought it would be.
Clean immediately after you are done fermenting, and the bucket will be fine.

Once you do a few batches, it'll become routine and won't seem so hard.
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Old 01-11-2013, 12:18 PM   #14
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If/when you decide to purchase additional carboys, do read some of the threads comparing glass to Better Bottles. There are strong opinions on either side of the debate, and I'm not advocating either one here -- you'd have to make up your own mind anyway -- but there are definitely advantages and disadvantages to each, for sure.

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Old 01-11-2013, 07:50 PM   #15
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Which do you prefer. Seems that glass would be easier to maintain and clean. Also last longer. Those things have to be pretty hard to scratch.

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Old 01-12-2013, 03:47 AM   #16
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The glass is definitely easier to clean than plastic and cannot easily be scratched. But, it's not scratching the glass that is an issue but rather the glass scratching you. Be aware that a 6 gallon glass jug filled with liquid can weigh over 50 pounds...I don't know how much pressure that is against the glass, but a flaw in the glass from manufacturing or a small crack in it from rough handling or whatever and a bad moment can be disasterous. You might want to check this thread out: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/brok...endium-376523/

From what I can tell, broken carboys don't happen that frequently but if it's you it happens to then that's one time too many. Plenty of folks use them for years without any problems, though. Lot's of folks swear by'em.

I've just started fermenting mead and have two new 3-gallon glass carboys, one of which I've got filled with a traditional mead. When I was washing and sanitizing the carboy and then moving it filled with mead I really felt uncomfortable. I've also got two old 5 or 6 gallon glass carboys that I had intended to use but I think I'll put some type of plant or something in them instead. I figure since I'm just starting and in the process of gathering up equipment that now is the time to pick what type of vessels I want to focus on. I figure I'll still use some gallon jugs and will probably use the 3-gallon carboys some but I plan on concentrating on a different type of vessel for fermenting and aging in.

What I am planning on for the future is using cornelius kegs for my fermentation vessels. I'll primary in a bucket then rack into a keg for secondary. From that point I'll simply rack from keg to keg and the mead will never see daylight until it's dispensed for bottling or drinking....doing it this way should should cut down on oxidation issues, too. Some folks primary in kegs and the mead or wine is never exposed to oxygen or daylight at all until it is either bottled or drank. These are the same type of kegs used for dispensing and carbonating beer and soft drinks.

Anyhow, just wanted to mention all this to you. We all got our decisions to make.

Best wishes,
Ed

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Old 01-12-2013, 04:33 AM   #17
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Very informative! This is only my second attempt at making wine and I have a lot to learn! Thanks a lot!

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Old 01-12-2013, 04:37 AM   #18
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That thread you posted is pretty scary also. Crazy to think that could just happen like that.

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Old 01-12-2013, 01:59 PM   #19
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I love glass, for pretty much anything I do. You can see what's going on inside, no fear of off flavours from plastic or leaching chemicals of any sort, easy to clean and hard to scratch.

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Old 01-12-2013, 02:16 PM   #20
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My intention was to make you aware of possibilities so that if you use carboys regularly that you are cautious with them.

I'm not that experienced with them (I'm a newbee, remember ) but some things that make sense to me:

*Inspect them regularly for small cracks in the glass
*Don't pour hot liquids into a cool carboy or really hot liquids into a room temp carboy. Widely differing bottle and liquid can cause cracks.
*Many folks set their carboys in milk crates for bottom support and I would assume for a catchment for some of the glass should a carboy break.
*Don't set a full carboy down on a concrete floor...you will not be able to precisely set the carboy down and one point of the bottle will "bump" first with all the mass of the liquid inside the bottle pressing against that single contact point. Put old carpet, thick carboard, foam matting, whatever down to set the carboy on.
*Some people use skateboards or small dollies to move filled carboys...use with caution.
*I really don't like the idea of those metal, plastic coated handles that go around the carboys' necks. They put sideways tension on the glass neck of the bottle. Definitely don't use them to carry a full carboy.
*Move glass carboys as little as possible. Fill them at the spot they will ferment/age.
*Wear heavy shoes or boots when working with the carboys...shattered glass will come to rest at "feet level", though injuries happen during the glass's trip to the floor, too.
*Know your own capability in regards to holding and carrying heavy objects and don't try to impress yourself with your awesome strenght.

Here's a couple of threads that I came up with by searching for carboy safety:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/glas...y-tips-193317/
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/care...35/index2.html

The article below is promoting moving away from glass...one side of the plastic vs. glass debate. There's a link within the short article to a list of carboy accidents that include a short description of what happened. Again, I want to emphasize that these accidents are infrequent but they *do* happen...I guess it depends on how much risk we want to take...or not take.
http://brewing.lustreking.com/articles/nomoreglass.html

Best wishes,
Ed

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