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Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Wine Making Forum > 5 weeks in and looking funny (sparkling)
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Old 08-28-2014, 10:53 AM   #1
DevinEdmonds
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Default 5 weeks in and looking funny (sparkling)

I came across very cheap soursop and because soursop juice is delicious I assumed a wine made from soursop should be too.

After about 10 days I removed the mashed up fruit in my nylon bag and continued to give it a good stir daily for the next week or so. By 3 weeks I was surprised to still see little bubbles but I figured I should just let it sit and check again later.

5 weeks in now and my soursop wine is still sparkling and you can hear fizziness when you put your ear to it. This also seems to be affecting the clarity, perhaps because the bubbles keep stirring up the debris on the bottom.

What's going on? What happened? Is it still good? Could this be a bacterial problem?

It still tastes fine (well alcoholic anyways, hopefully less of a bite once it is bottled and sits for some time), hydrometer is now 0, but still there are little bubbles. I should mention also it is just in a large bucket, garbage-can like container, nothing fancy though I have been very careful with cleanliness.

Any advice or ideas are appreciated. Thanks in advance!

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Old 08-28-2014, 05:47 PM   #2
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I'm a newb to winemaking with only a couple batches under my belt but it sounds like you need to degas your wine to me, I read once on the Jack Keller website if you don't degas your wine it affects the clearing, have you degassed your wine yet?

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Old 08-28-2014, 06:08 PM   #3
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Thanks for the input. I had never heard of degassing before! Reading a little bit online, that seems like the issue. I guess it is time to stir stir stir...

Appreciate it.

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Old 08-28-2014, 06:11 PM   #4
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Have never come across soursop but no matter. Not sure if you provided all the relevant information. Looks like you either are making use of the yeast that may have taken a ride with the paw paw or you are making use of free floating yeast to ferment the fruit. Either way, the size of the colony will be fairly small and it will take a significant amount of time for such chance yeasts to develop into the size of colony you need to really gobble up the available sugars. Looks like the colony is just about there.
Now you say the hydrometer is at zero. I think I know what you mean but are you in fact saying that it is at 1.000? What was the gravity five weeks ago? If it is at 1.000 then it is possible that there is still some sugar left to convert to alcohol. After all, the gravity of pure water is 1.000 and the gravity of fermented wine ought to be less than 1 - around .996 or 994 or thereabouts as alcohol is less dense than water.
HebrewedsoIbrew: the need to degas to improve clarity is important but if the wine is still fermenting then clarity is not really the issue at the moment and neither is (for all intents and purposes) any need to really degas. Simply allowing a wine to quietly age (in a container with no "headroom" - ie no real space for air above the surface of the wine , so the container is sealed with a drilled bung and airlock filled with water - allowing the CO2 (the gas) to escape but preventing air from entering) will enable the CO2 to quietly dissipate and leave the wine thus allowing all the particles of fruit and yeast and proteins and tannins and whatnot to drop out of suspension and fall as sediment and lees -and thus resulting in a more clear wine as time passes.

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Old 08-29-2014, 01:53 PM   #5
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Thanks for the help! Nice to have another perspective.

I used a dry yeast that I bought for making fruit wine and the fermentation was pretty vigorous the first ten days or so before I removed the fruit. I should have mentioned this before, sorry about that.

Soursop's kind of a weird fruit but the juice you can make or get from it is really excellent.

The hydrometer I brought along has two readings on it, one is specific gravity but the one I was reading is on the other side and in %. The mead was at 15% (which I guess is the same as 1.120 SG? that's what the hydrometer says on the other side) when I first plopped it in the first day and now it is 0% (1.000 SG), so I think in this case maybe fermentation is finished and these fizzy bubbles are CO2?

Thanks again for the ideas and information. All good to know and will help me next time around too.

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Old 08-31-2014, 09:46 PM   #6
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15%abv is the uper limet for a lot of wine yeast. So it is most likely "done" fermenting. There is some suger left, but not a lot. It may slowly ferment down a little more over time.
Rack it into a carboy with an airlock as soon as you can. A covered bucket is no longer a "safe" choice for the wine. It will be well worth the investment to buy one. With the airlock on and the wine in a clear carboy, seeing how it is clearing or degassing will be much easier.


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