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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > BIAB Brewing > BIAB Strike Water
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Old 12-01-2012, 04:48 PM   #1
Tinman13
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Default BIAB Strike Water

Hello, looking to make the change over from extrit brewing to AG (BIAB)
Ive read and read all I can find here on HBT about it
I now have a question
the amt of strike to use, I have seen some say 1.5QT per # others 1.3QT/# how do I know how much to use

I understand to work backwards for my total water needed but this one item is not clear

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Old 12-01-2012, 05:02 PM   #2
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BIAB strike water will be total volume. Work backwards or

total water = finished batch size + grain absorption + boiloff + trub losses + fermenter losses (yeast cake)

so roughly for a 5 gal batch, YMMV

total water = 5+.75+1+.5+.5 or about 7.75 plus minus

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Old 12-01-2012, 05:05 PM   #3
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Default Easy peasy

There is a very easy formula.

Batch volume + grain absorption + boil off + trub loss = strike volume

Dont' worry about the other all grain mash thinkness ratios used in the multi vessel systems. They don't apply here.

Info you will need
Gain absorption = grain volume in pounds * .06
Boil off = you can use 1.25 gal / hour until you know your equipment. Though I recommend googling boil-off-rates. There are some calculators which will tell you this more exactly.
Trub loss = use .25 gal as a good estimate.

That is all there is to it.

For example.
5.5 gal batch + (10 pounds grain *.06) + 1.25 gal (60 min boil) + .25 = 7.6 gallons (if the math in my head is correct. but you get the picture...)

Look up SIMPLEBIAB calculator. it does most of this math for you. very nice!

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Old 12-01-2012, 09:14 PM   #4
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Oh please, just pour 7.5 gallons of water in your pot heat to your strike temp, add bag and grains and stir stir stir. 5 gallon batch of course.

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Old 12-01-2012, 10:37 PM   #5
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Before you start you need to know the size of pot you have. You can't fit 7.75 gallons of water plus 14 pounds of grain in a 7.5 gallon pot, yet I manage to make a 5.5 gallon batch of all grain BIAB in a 7.5 gallon turkey fryer. Your first run through may not be perfect but it will get you a start. You can also start with a little less volume than you plan and do a simple wort addition by dunk sparging the bag or even just pour water through.

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Old 12-01-2012, 11:30 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
Before you start you need to know the size of pot you have. You can't fit 7.75 gallons of water plus 14 pounds of grain in a 7.5 gallon pot, yet I manage to make a 5.5 gallon batch of all grain BIAB in a 7.5 gallon turkey fryer. Your first run through may not be perfect but it will get you a start. You can also start with a little less volume than you plan and do a simple wort addition by dunk sparging the bag or even just pour water through.
+1

This is exactly what I did when I used a turkey fryer setup - mash in 5 gallons within the turkey fryer and dunk sparge in a second 5 gallon pot with about 2.5 gallons.
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Old 12-02-2012, 12:51 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
Before you start you need to know the size of pot you have. You can't fit 7.75 gallons of water plus 14 pounds of grain in a 7.5 gallon pot, yet I manage to make a 5.5 gallon batch of all grain BIAB in a 7.5 gallon turkey fryer. Your first run through may not be perfect but it will get you a start. You can also start with a little less volume than you plan and do a simple wort addition by dunk sparging the bag or even just pour water through.
I have 9 gal (36QT) Turkey Fryer with backet
I undersand how to work backwards (thanks for all your post to clear that up)
it's how do I know to start with 5gal or 5.5 etc, I have read posts here to mult #of grains X qts of water. some posts listed 1.25qts /# others up to 1.5qts/# of grain
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Old 12-02-2012, 01:15 AM   #8
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I usually set the mash at 2.3 qts per pound in the software I use and it works out well. Since you have a larger pot than me you could set it for 2.5 or even higher.

if you do the dunk sparge, you don't have to have heated water for it. It may be just a little more efficient but cold water also dissolves a bit of the sugar and is easier to work with. You can just put the cold (cool, warm, hot, whatever) water in your fermenting bucket and dunk the bag of grains in it, then pour the wort into the boiling pot.

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Old 12-02-2012, 01:26 AM   #9
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How many pounds of grain are you using. I have a 9 gallon turkey fryer pot and you can probably fit all the water and grains without having to do a dunk sparge. The 1.25 or 1.5 qts per pound pretty much goes out the window with BIAB.

The excel file found on this page is an excellent and simple calulator

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Old 12-02-2012, 03:59 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinman13
Hello, looking to make the change over from extrit brewing to AG (BIAB)
Ive read and read all I can find here on HBT about it
I now have a question
the amt of strike to use, I have seen some say 1.5QT per # others 1.3QT/# how do I know how much to use

I understand to work backwards for my total water needed but this one item is not clear
I moved from extract to what is a hybrid BIAB partial mash 11.5 gallon batch about 6 months ago. I keep it simple. Doing a 1.050ish brew:

I raise 10 gallons to strike temp, 158-160 (to cover the thermometer)
Bag 7-8 lbs of grains and drop it in the kettle
Poke it and dunk it here and there for 60 minutes with the lid on
It generally drops below 145 in an hour, but sometimes I fire the burner for a few minutes
Pull the bag on a big strainer over a two gallon pot and take it to the kitchen
Sparge it with about a half gallon with 170 degree water
Return the runnings to the kettle and bring it all to a boil
Add 7 or lbs of DME
Top it off to about 13 gallons and then bring it to boil
Start the clock and add bittering additions....

It's very simple, but the results have been excellent IMHO.

I have always felt the need to go all grain, but this method has been so good that I am content now. I play with calculators, but in the end this method is the backbone for all that I brew. I just add or subtract DME to adjust my gravity targets based on experience. Its a great way to dip into BIAB and mashing. I know that many will say the volumes are critical, but I seem to get really good efficiencies this way and the end product makes me happy. And, I have one 20 big vessel to wash afterward.

Hope this is useful info. Cheers!
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