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Old 07-04-2013, 01:26 PM   #1691
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Lately my beers haven't been as clear but I'm thinking it may be due to switching my base malt from Briess to Maris Otter? I'm going to try cold crashing a little longer before kegging, 5 days instead of 2-3 and see if that helps. Beer still tastes great but it's nice to have a nice looking beer.

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Old 07-04-2013, 01:44 PM   #1692
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after reading a few more posts...it seems that it is better to add heat after you add your grains and your mash temp is low, compared to having too high of a mash temp after you add your grains. Then you have to rush around finding ice, cold water or frozen water bottles which I had to do once.

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Old 07-05-2013, 03:52 PM   #1693
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Originally Posted by Euphist View Post
First thing is to make sure that you are using a polyester voile bag - not muslin. The voile will keep the flour out of your wort.

Second - RDWHAHB. Personally, I just drain the whole kettle into the fermenter. The height of my spigot leaves behind maybe a quart which allows for the worst of the cold break and the irish moss.

A couple of weeks in the keg, carbing and chilling, and most of my beers are crystal clear (well, except for one - not sure what's up with it.)
I do use voile. Maybe it is proteins that makes it cloudy. I added a spigot to the brew kettle and it has a SS elbow inside to 2mm of the bottom. I leave behind maybe 8 ounces

Still cloudy after aging and chilling, so it might be protein haze. A subject for another thread.
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Old 07-05-2013, 04:40 PM   #1694
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Sounds like cold haze. My beers will have that for about 3 weeks in the fridge after that they are crystal( unless I dump the yeast into the beer which I do on purpose fairly often)

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Old 07-06-2013, 03:26 PM   #1695
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Default I think I need some serious help

I am relatively new to brewing, I have made 7 batches so far. The problem is I am having hip and hand surgery at the end of August and only have a few weeks to iron out some process issues. I will be out of commission for 3 to 4 months and I have 2 goals that I would like to accomplish before the surgery.

1) Have a few batches come out that are reasonable beers. These are for me to drink while I am recovering.

2) Have 4 good batches that are either lagering or conditioning that would be ready for when I can start brewing again.

My first 3 batches were extract brews. They were just OK, both light in color and light in flavor. I talked to the people at the LHBS about this and they suggested maybe I measured the steeping grains too low. I did 3 batches and they all came out with the same issues. I am drinking them anyway :-)

The rest of the batches were BIAB, and I bottled the first one a week ago. It is even lighter then light. I can attach an image if it would help, but suffice it to say it is way too clear.

The first 3 BIAB batches had OG's of 1.024, 1.036, 1.038. I should have figured it out earlier but the grain was not ground well. It is the same as the extract brews but I wasn't able to put this together until I read posts in this forum. I now have a corona mill and will start grinding my own grain. Of these 3 batches, I'm hoping 1 of them is drinkable.

During these batches I was working to get the process right. I brew 2.5 gallon batches, and I was not getting enough trub free wort to fill the fermentor. I decided it was better to have more wort then not enough so my 4th BIAB was 3.5 gallons. I also double ground the grain for this brew. I am unsure of the OG for this batch, I spaced on measuring until all I had was trub wort.

I know I have to do a better job in measuring, I'm hoping having enough wort will make that easier.

Process:

  • grind my own grain
  • brew batches of 3.5 gallons so I have enough trub free wort to fill the fermentors with 2.5 gallons
  • ferment/condition for 4 weeks in primary
  • cold crash for 1 week in primary
  • bottle condition for 3 weeks

Questions:
From brew day to bottle takes 5 weeks with this schedule. If I only have 4 weeks, is it better to spend the last week ferment/condition or cold crash?

I cold crash in the primary fermentor. Maybe my experience to date is with more trub then I should have in the primary, should I rack to secondary before cold crashing so the volume of yeast/trub on the bottom of the beer is smaller to make bottling clearer. Even when I cold crash, when I put the siphon in the bottom of the fermentor a small cloud occurs.

For the brews that will lager, I will of course rack them to secondary bottles. Should I top them off with water so they are full with less of an airspace? Do I lean to a higher OG and color to account for this added water?

I am very open minded at this point, any suggestions will be considered.

Thank you
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Old 07-06-2013, 05:32 PM   #1696
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Has anyone found that there is too fine of a grind for doing BIAB?

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Old 07-06-2013, 06:11 PM   #1697
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raymadigan View Post
Questions:
From brew day to bottle takes 5 weeks with this schedule. If I only have 4 weeks, is it better to spend the last week ferment/condition or cold crash?

I cold crash in the primary fermentor. Maybe my experience to date is with more trub then I should have in the primary, should I rack to secondary before cold crashing so the volume of yeast/trub on the bottom of the beer is smaller to make bottling clearer. Even when I cold crash, when I put the siphon in the bottom of the fermentor a small cloud occurs.

For the brews that will lager, I will of course rack them to secondary bottles. Should I top them off with water so they are full with less of an airspace? Do I lean to a higher OG and color to account for this added water?

I am very open minded at this point, any suggestions will be considered.

Thank you
I personally don't worry about "trub free" wort...it's all going to settle out anyway. No sense in making an extra gallon to dump. (though a little loss is inevitable.)

As far as the corona mill goes, the saying is, crank it until you're scared then give it another quarter turn. Mine is actually set a quarter turn out from the plates touching. Since the manufacturer doesn't know the meaning of the word "tolerance" the same may not work for you.

The fermentation schedule will work either way. If it was me, I would probably just cold crash the last couple of days. Honestly though, if you have good temp control and are pitching enough healthy yeast, 4 weeks is probably overkill. At first, I had to learn to be patient with my beer. Then, as I improved my process, I learned that patience for patience sake is just wasting time. Some of my beers hit the keg in 8 or 9 days, some in 3 or 4 weeks...

As for the siphon stirring up trub, I just hold it up off the bottom.

The only time that I top off is if I have way more boil off than expected. (like when I got my new burner). That said, I keg, so if I was worried about head space, I would just purge with co2.
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Old 07-06-2013, 11:24 PM   #1698
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msa8967
Has anyone found that there is too fine of a grind for doing BIAB?
Would love to know this too.
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Old 07-10-2013, 01:36 AM   #1699
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphist View Post
I personally don't worry about "trub free" wort...it's all going to settle out anyway. No sense in making an extra gallon to dump. (though a little loss is inevitable.)
The issue is, when you are only making 2.5 gallons then too much trub in the primary means 1 less beer :-)

Quote:
The fermentation schedule will work either way. If it was me, I would probably just cold crash the last couple of days. Honestly though, if you have good temp control and are pitching enough healthy yeast, 4 weeks is probably overkill. At first, I had to learn to be patient with my beer. Then, as I improved my process, I learned that patience for patience sake is just wasting time. Some of my beers hit the keg in 8 or 9 days, some in 3 or 4 weeks...
I understand what your saying. I can play it by ear. I don't keg and have a limited place to store the bottles. I am the only one drinking my beer so some will just have to wait. Sometimes, bottling is a PITA.
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:27 PM   #1700
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphist View Post
The fermentation schedule will work either way. If it was me, I would probably just cold crash the last couple of days. Honestly though, if you have good temp control and are pitching enough healthy yeast, 4 weeks is probably overkill. At first, I had to learn to be patient with my beer. Then, as I improved my process, I learned that patience for patience sake is just wasting time. Some of my beers hit the keg in 8 or 9 days, some in 3 or 4 weeks...
I too have found longer fermentation schedules to be overkill. I'm usually bottling within 14 days of brewing on most of my beers. I brew a lot of IPA's that I dry hop so my schedule is letting it ferment for about a week and if the hydrometer tells me fermentation is done, I then dry hop in my fermenting bucket (I see no need to transfer to secondary as I feel this is overkill as well) and let that ride for another week before I rack the beer to my bottling bucket. I suppose I could rack to a secondary vessel and let it ride longer for clearing purposes, but I'm not all that concerned about how clear my beers are as long as they are tasting great...
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