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Old 08-26-2011, 07:00 PM   #21
aerospaceeng
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I am doing this recipe soon too. I ordered the sorghum online and I plan on roasting it tonight and brewing next Friday. I am kegging it and I hope it will be ready in 6 weeks or so. This will be my 2nd time brewing (by myself) and the 1st partial grain batch. Should be interesting.

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Old 09-03-2011, 06:58 PM   #22
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This might be a dumb question, but I'm trying to figure out how to add the sorghum. Did you just roast it, and then steep it, like 30 minutes at 160F, or something different?

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Old 09-05-2011, 01:55 PM   #23
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I am interested in maybe trying to make this for my gf. Just got my first brewing kit and am yet to use it.
How necessary is the letting the sorghum waft for a week after roasting? I will admit I am impatient and would love to have this beer ready to go by Halloween for her so time is precious.

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Old 09-06-2011, 08:11 PM   #24
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Well, if you roast it this Saturday (9/10), wait a week and then brew (9/17), ferment for 3 weeks (10/8), and wait the suggested 3 weeks (10/29), you still have a buffer of 2 days before 10/31. I am impatient too, but my wife will just have to wait.

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Old 10-13-2011, 07:47 AM   #25
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Default Carb Sugar for 5.5 Gallon Batch

Hello,
I recently started homebrewing and just put the 5.5 gallon recipe in to ferment; so far it is bubbling wonderfully. I just had a bottle explosion due to uneven carbonation in a previous batch, and want to make sure that doesn't happen again with this one. How much corn sugar did you use to carb the 5.5 gallon batch of this pumpkin ale? The 2.5 gallon recipe calls for 2.5 ozs, which would double to 5 ozs, but that seems like a lot. How much corn sugar is recommended?

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Old 10-14-2011, 04:59 PM   #26
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On beersmith, it calculates that for 2.4 volumes of carbonation in a fridge for a 5.5 gallon batch, you should use 2.68oz of corn sugar. 5 oz might give you problems, but I can't say for sure.

2.5 oz of corn sugar at the same temperature as what I just calculated in a 2.5 gallon batch would give you 3.4 volumes of CO2. It's the same as kegging at 21 psi. Seems a little high, I believe most people prefer kegged pressures somewhere between 10 and 15 psi, but more in the 12-14 psi range.

Anyways, there are plenty of calculators and charts around that you can use to estimate what kind of carbonation different amounts of corn sugar will give you. I'm not sure what kind of pressure is required for a bottle bomb though.

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Old 09-15-2012, 04:48 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsector View Post
On beersmith, it calculates that for 2.4 volumes of carbonation in a fridge for a 5.5 gallon batch, you should use 2.68oz of corn sugar. 5 oz might give you problems, but I can't say for sure.

2.5 oz of corn sugar at the same temperature as what I just calculated in a 2.5 gallon batch would give you 3.4 volumes of CO2. It's the same as kegging at 21 psi. Seems a little high, I believe most people prefer kegged pressures somewhere between 10 and 15 psi, but more in the 12-14 psi range.

Anyways, there are plenty of calculators and charts around that you can use to estimate what kind of carbonation different amounts of corn sugar will give you. I'm not sure what kind of pressure is required for a bottle bomb though.
2 questions... 1 on this post and 1 on the recipe..

How do you figure out the desired VOlumes of CO2 for your beer? I've struggled with this in the past and I guess just gotten lucky...

Q2 - I brewed this pumpkin last week and noticed when racking into the primary that there are a lot of particles from the pie filling and puree that made the journey. Do you guys put anything in the carboys to kill off these particles so they don't make it into your bottles. I know you want some yeast in the bottles for bottle conditioning, but there has to be some way to filter the majority of these particles...
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:27 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by briansk View Post
2 questions... 1 on this post and 1 on the recipe..

How do you figure out the desired VOlumes of CO2 for your beer? I've struggled with this in the past and I guess just gotten lucky...

Q2 - I brewed this pumpkin last week and noticed when racking into the primary that there are a lot of particles from the pie filling and puree that made the journey. Do you guys put anything in the carboys to kill off these particles so they don't make it into your bottles. I know you want some yeast in the bottles for bottle conditioning, but there has to be some way to filter the majority of these particles...
Would the normal gelatin method be helpful at clearing out the pumpkin bits?

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/beer-gelatin-69919/
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Old 08-15-2013, 12:32 AM   #29
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Can this recipe be made using just a kettle and a strainer or does a more complex system (ie false bottom etc.) need to be used to boil the wort. I just started brewing and was wanting to make a gluten free pumpkin ale for my dad for this upcoming fall.

Thanks!

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Old 08-21-2013, 03:11 AM   #30
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Default Sorghum?

Where did you purchase the sorghum? Was it malted? I can not find sorghum grain anywhere other then in my neighborhood grocery store. Is this the same, hence why it is roasted?

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