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-   -   Soda in soda kegs (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f19/soda-soda-kegs-48894/)

tuckferrorists 12-23-2007 12:09 AM

Soda in soda kegs
 
I really don't know where to post this so hopefully the mods can help me out. Has anyone actually bought the boxed bag soda concentrate from Sam's and put it in the corny keg and poured from the tap. Would you have to dilute it with boiled water that doesn't have oxygen and then pressurize it. Would this work?

Also, I realize I could just use the keg for more HB but for non drinkers and kids it would be nice. Also as a mixer for crown and sprites.

reidoreilly 12-23-2007 10:48 AM

Yes, ive done it, but I cant seem to serve it right, it comes out too flat. Im sure someone here could help.

Beerrific 12-23-2007 11:25 AM

I have never heard of anyone buying the bags of syrup, but plenty of people get the soda flavor extracts (sold at all of the major online HBS). I have never done it myself so I can't offer any advise.

GuateBrewer 12-23-2007 03:18 PM

http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2000/SeemaMeraj.shtml

According to this you need 3+ vols of co2 which puts you in the 17+ PSI range, sounds like you would need a dual regulator setup for something like this.

I was thinking of doing the same, but just buying 10 of the 2 or 3 liters when they are on sale instead of messing around with measuring out the sticky goo syrup stuff.

Cheers!

tuckferrorists 12-23-2007 04:57 PM

Well from what I've been reading, the pressure on fountain drinks is different than canned drinks.

david_42 12-23-2007 08:41 PM

I haven't tried that. I buy concentrates & keep a cornie full of water at 35 psi. Anything less than that & the soda is flat (and this is with 15' of 3/16"). So, a pint of fizzy water & 1/2 cap of concentrate & I'm good.

Jesse17 12-23-2007 09:56 PM

Ok, there's been some serious responces, so I'll go ahead and say my first responce...

Soda in a soda keg??? What a silly idea. You could have beer in it.:mug:

That's almost as bad as SWMBO wanting to park a car in our garage, when we could use it as a wood shop.:)

Hannable1975 04-05-2011 01:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jesse17 (Post 487707)
Ok, there's been some serious responces, so I'll go ahead and say my first responce...

Soda in a soda keg??? What a silly idea. You could have beer in it.:mug:

That's almost as bad as SWMBO wanting to park a car in our garage, when we could use it as a wood shop.:)

I know, I know - Zombie thread resurrection - but I thought this quote was awesome....

CollinLeon 05-30-2011 09:18 AM

I buy the 5g boxes of soft drink syrup from Sams (and other places). I then transfer the syrup into cleaned 2-liter soft drink bottles for storage. I usually drink a 2-liter bottle of soda a day and I make up a bottle of it each morning. It takes about 1 cup of syrup for a 2-liter bottle of soft drink. I like my drinks a bit less sweet, so if you are wanting the original sweetness, you might need to go with a bit more than 1 cup. I start out by placing about a cup or so of water into the 2-liter bottle the night before and freezing it on its side in the freezer. The next morning, I take this bottle out of the freezer and give it a couple of hits with a dead blow hammer in order to break up the ice. I then add about a cup of the syrup to the bottle and fill the bottle with water, leaving about an inch or so of air space at the top. I have a bottle cap in which I've drilled a hole and installed a metal schraeder (tire) valve. I install this bottle cap on the 2-liter bottle and then burp the air out of it. I have a tire air chuck attached to the regulator for my CO2 tank, so I then pressurize the 2-liter bottle to about 65 psi and then shake the bottle a bit until the pressure goes down (the bottle feels 'soft'). I repeat the pressurization and shaking sequence usually about 3 times. When the pressure in the bottle doesn't go down anymore, you've put as much CO2 into the liquid as it will absorb. Since the temperature of your tap water varies throughout the year, you will need to add a bit more syrup during the summer months since the warmer water will melt more of the ice.

You can use this method to carbonate a lot of different beverages -- some taste better than others... I found that I did not particularly like the taste of carbonated milk (chocolate or plain), coffee, or tea.


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