*Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway - Enter Now!*

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Community > General Chit Chat > Maximum Return on Investment- The Supermarket
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-29-2012, 04:56 AM   #61
peaktopview
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: denver, co
Posts: 80
Liked 9 Times on 6 Posts

Default

if you get into bread making, or for your pizzas too, a cheap pizza stone option is un-glazed quarry tile. i stopped by a tile outlet store and found a case of discontinued tiles for something around $20. i think there were 20 6"x6" tiles in the case. popped them in my oven for an 18"x18" square tile area. plus i have a bunch for back up in case one brakes or such. gave them a quick scrub out of the box and popped them in the oven at 250 to make sure they were dry before baking on them. gets you a real nice crispy crust when baking on them at 500*. do a search on the internet, think i read up on it on a pizza forum. i just keep mine in the oven all the time on the bottom rack. beats paying $60 for a small round pizza stone.

b

edit: make sure you give them a little extra time at 500* to soak up that heat. probably a good 15 mins extra will do.

__________________
peaktopview is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-29-2012, 05:16 PM   #62
cheezydemon3
Registered User
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: louisville
Posts: 12,967
Liked 1641 Times on 1234 Posts
Likes Given: 3007

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peaktopview View Post
if you get into bread making, or for your pizzas too, a cheap pizza stone option is un-glazed quarry tile. i stopped by a tile outlet store and found a case of discontinued tiles for something around $20. i think there were 20 6"x6" tiles in the case. popped them in my oven for an 18"x18" square tile area. plus i have a bunch for back up in case one brakes or such. gave them a quick scrub out of the box and popped them in the oven at 250 to make sure they were dry before baking on them. gets you a real nice crispy crust when baking on them at 500*. do a search on the internet, think i read up on it on a pizza forum. i just keep mine in the oven all the time on the bottom rack. beats paying $60 for a small round pizza stone.

b

edit: make sure you give them a little extra time at 500* to soak up that heat. probably a good 15 mins extra will do.
I use my BIG cast iron with fantastic results.

I either turn it upside down and use it as a pizza stone, or Heat it on the stove top and mold crust into it (usually for a DEEP dish if that way) and then transfer to broiling oven to finish and brown the top.
__________________
cheezydemon3 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-01-2012, 02:16 PM   #63
CreamyGoodness
Grows On You Like Yeast
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CreamyGoodness's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Astoria, NY
Posts: 6,723
Liked 1618 Times on 1141 Posts
Likes Given: 2737

Default

I'm not sure if leftovers ideas is out of the scope of the thread, but I do like this idea. Last night we had a couple corn on the cobs left in the fridge that had maybe another day before they went awry. I cut the kernels off the cob and tossed in a pan with a little olive oil and salt and pepper. I also had a couple scraps of gruyere and maybe a teaspoon of grated parm left, so I whisked them into some hot milk with a bit of cayenne. Nice little side dish, and "free" in that I already had the capital hanging around.

__________________


You are more likely to have a threesome with members of the Japanese women's curling team whilst spinning a plate on your head than you are likely to screw up a batch of JAOM.

YES, WE HAVE TRIED OTHER YEASTS! USE BREAD YEAST FOR JAOM!

CreamyGoodness is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-08-2012, 03:26 PM   #64
zac
Thread Killer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
zac's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Marion. Va
Posts: 3,788
Liked 153 Times on 150 Posts

Default

I know I'm blessed, but I live on a beef cattle farm, so the beef is no problem. The neighbors raise "milk" so there's an endless supply of milk as long as I keep a supply of cheese or steaks on hand. Another neighbor raises chickens: fresh eggs & dead roosters occasionally. The pig farmer down the way died a few years back, but his wife leases the farm to a guy who deals in pork. He likes homebrew. My garden is roughly an acre in size. Since May, we haven't bought a single item of produce outside of mangos or something else exotic. We raise virtually all of our own spices/herbs except some of our favorite blends, and saffron & nutmeg etc. I freeze stuff, I dry stuff. I save seeds. I've dried untold amounts of basil, cilantro, oreagno, dill, mint & horseradish this year. Froze something like 20 one gallon zip lock bags full of ear corn, dried pound after pound of black beans & great northern beans. We raised all kinds of root crops, and worlds of winter veggies such as Butternut Squash, acorn squash, winter squash etc. I have the seeds already dried to replant most of the garden next year. About this time of the year, I'm sick of eating squash, spinach & zuchani.

All that said, we still have the weekly trip to the grocery store for stuff like flour, sugar, napkins, rice & most importantly: Dog Food!!! Anything else such as toothpaste, soap or paper towels comes from Sams Club, and gets bought in bulk.

__________________
zac is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-14-2012, 09:20 PM   #65
drvinck
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: montreal, QC
Posts: 1
Likes Given: 5

Default

If you really want to cut down on food price, stop eating meat.

__________________
drvinck is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-15-2012, 06:17 AM   #66
Obliviousbrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Benidorm, Alicante/Spain
Posts: 1,571
Liked 228 Times on 159 Posts
Likes Given: 168

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drvinck View Post
If you really want to cut down on food price, stop eating meat.
Wait a second there so you can eat soemthing that is not meat?????
__________________
Obliviousbrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-16-2012, 04:54 PM   #67
dkwolf
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Sac City, IA
Posts: 639
Liked 167 Times on 112 Posts
Likes Given: 48

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peaktopview View Post
if you get into bread making, or for your pizzas too, a cheap pizza stone option is un-glazed quarry tile. i stopped by a tile outlet store and found a case of discontinued tiles for something around $20. i think there were 20 6"x6" tiles in the case. popped them in my oven for an 18"x18" square tile area. plus i have a bunch for back up in case one brakes or such. gave them a quick scrub out of the box and popped them in the oven at 250 to make sure they were dry before baking on them. gets you a real nice crispy crust when baking on them at 500*. do a search on the internet, think i read up on it on a pizza forum. i just keep mine in the oven all the time on the bottom rack. beats paying $60 for a small round pizza stone.

b

edit: make sure you give them a little extra time at 500* to soak up that heat. probably a good 15 mins extra will do.
Don't know where you're buying your pizza stone at for $60, but I've got two of them. Picked both of them up for less than $30 total.

With the stones, it's a good idea to leave them in the oven all the time, the heat cycles help condition them, and in turn, the thermal mass of the stone helps regulate temperature in the oven. Say you have to open the door to check a casserole - that stone sitting in there at 400° helps get the temperature back up quickly after the door closes again.
__________________
dkwolf is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-16-2012, 06:56 PM   #68
mbauer013
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 279
Liked 25 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 41

Default

This has been said before, but as an illustration I just bought a half of beef. Total cost was about $750 with processing and gas to go get it from the butcher. For that amount of money I got:
100lbs ground beef
70 lbs roasts
30 lbs hotdogs (I can't stand them really but the kid loves them and at least we know its actual meat in these)
50 lbs assorted steaks
5 lbs beef liver
20 lbs soup bones

So even discounting the liver and soup bones we paid about $3.00 a lb for everything from 80/20 ground beef to ribeye and t-bone steak custom cut and packaged. At the store last week I saw ground beef for 3.99/lb and steaks for anywhere upwards of 8.00/lb. Pretty good deal and this meat will last us a full year. Soup bones will be made into stock for french onion soup and stew. Liver will probably go to the dog, but it was less than 50 cents/lb so ceaper then doggie treats.

__________________
mbauer013 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2012, 06:43 PM   #69
CreamyGoodness
Grows On You Like Yeast
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CreamyGoodness's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Astoria, NY
Posts: 6,723
Liked 1618 Times on 1141 Posts
Likes Given: 2737

Default

Oh, sorry for the bump but I have one more. Make a big pot of coffee on Sunday morning. Let the leftovers get cold, and then on Monday morning send SWMBO into work with a cup of iced coffee. Just add milk, ice, and Splenda.

__________________


You are more likely to have a threesome with members of the Japanese women's curling team whilst spinning a plate on your head than you are likely to screw up a batch of JAOM.

YES, WE HAVE TRIED OTHER YEASTS! USE BREAD YEAST FOR JAOM!

CreamyGoodness is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 02:13 PM   #70
CreamyGoodness
Grows On You Like Yeast
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CreamyGoodness's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Astoria, NY
Posts: 6,723
Liked 1618 Times on 1141 Posts
Likes Given: 2737

Default

One more bump, assuming people are still interested. Buy the $0.99 gigantic jug of storebrand white vinegar. Uses include but are not limited to:

1) Remove capsaicin from your hands after you have handled hot peppers
2) Mix with water and put in spray bottle in place of windex
3) Add a little to you a basin of water to soak "tired" produce (takes less than an hour to perk them back up!)
4) When pickling okra or green beans etc. white vinegar can be used to "cut" cider or wine vinegar should you run out of the other stuff.
5) No cider vinegar when preparing store-bought sauerkraut? Mix a little apple juice with white vinegar, works in a pinch.


I funnel this into a smaller, more attractive bottle for kitchen cooking use.

__________________


You are more likely to have a threesome with members of the Japanese women's curling team whilst spinning a plate on your head than you are likely to screw up a batch of JAOM.

YES, WE HAVE TRIED OTHER YEASTS! USE BREAD YEAST FOR JAOM!

CreamyGoodness is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Return of the Jedi on Spike megalomani General Chit Chat 9 07-12-2012 01:21 PM
beer=good investment lovemybrew General Chit Chat 4 05-19-2011 03:40 PM
Triumphant Return! llazy_llama General Chit Chat 8 01-25-2010 02:42 AM
Bull in Supermarket PurdyGood General Chit Chat 2 04-27-2009 06:23 PM
Online Investment Sites srm775 General Chit Chat 26 03-05-2008 09:27 PM