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Old 07-07-2010, 10:48 PM   #1
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Default Boats: hull shapes for coastal tooling around...?

What are the boat hull shapes appropriate for gentle coastal waters use?

I am looking at getting a low-cost, occasional use, boat, four people capacity for day touring (no Atlantic crossing, no naked babes on deck). A 10 Hp motor would do the job, and allow me on local ponds.

I have been trying to find some basic information on this for a while... You would think the net would be awash with stuff. Not luck, or, I am not looking at the right places?

I have seen aluminum "bass" boats, but have no idea how well they work for my purpose. The next choice would be fiberglass, a "Boston Whaler" type, (which I would want to avoid due to local company history (=bad)).

Anybody with boat knowledge to share?

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Old 07-07-2010, 11:13 PM   #2
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High sides, deep V. If you will be in a bay the winds can pick up pretty quick and you can face 2-4 footers in a worst case scenario. Bass boats are heavy and flat. A wave can come over the bow and fill up the boat pretty fast. A "skiff" would be the way i'd go, and sounds like it would suit your purpose well. A 14' Carolina Skiff with a 15hp outboard would be nice for an open bay as well as a smallish pond.

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Old 07-08-2010, 12:32 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHN51277 View Post
Carolina Skiff
Two demerits to Carolina Skiff for butchering the word gunwale on their literature... !
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Old 07-08-2010, 01:04 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHN51277 View Post
High sides, deep V.
I carry an Able Bodied seaman's certificate so I know basic stuff.

You've got a trade off here that you've got to consider. Craft with a deep v hull will take rough water better but are going to ride rough in even calm seas. They're hard to sink but you wouldn't believe it when riding in them. Meanwhile, a flat bottomed hull will ride beautifully in calm, flat seas but you're in for trouble if you get into any kind of weather.

Like anything, you've got to decide what you're REALLY going to use it for. If you're going to be in it constantly then you want the V hull. If you're only taking it out a few times a year on a georgeous day then go for something flatter.
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Old 07-08-2010, 01:10 AM   #5
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If you are only in gentle waters, and you are limited to 10 horse power, I would go with a square, flat bottomed jon boat. They are a lot more stable when standing up while fishing. They also go faster than a 14 ft V hull, if you have a couple of fat beer drinkers in the boat.

I have a 14 ft V hull with a 9.9, and with two big guys in it, it plows through the water instead of planing across the top. It is also very tippy while standing up & casting from the front of the boat.

We have a lot of fun, but a flat bottom jon boat would be better.

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Old 07-08-2010, 01:40 AM   #6
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I think you are looking for a tri-hull with a small outboard. I don't know who still makes them, but a tri-hull is basically a combination between V hull and jon boat style. It is a shallow v hull with two "v"s on the side.

Also called a modified v. Great for intercoastals, small bays, and such. Another benefit is the shallow draft. and light weight. Check it out.

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Old 07-08-2010, 01:53 AM   #7
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Another option is a pontoon boat, which is just a blast. They do not take any kind of sea, and you are not going to get anywhere fast. But they are light, and you can fit 4 to 6 ppl even on small ones, you can jump off the side, great for fishing and easy to drive.

Added: Pontoons are not safe for any rough water, or areas where it may turn choppy. I added this because I noticed you are near the coast.

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Old 07-08-2010, 06:23 PM   #8
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Check out a small Boston Whaler. I have a 15 ft Boston Whaler with a 20hp Johnson outboard I use when Im down in FLA. It is no Hatteras sportfisher with twin cat c32 1600bhp diesels, but it works for near/intercostal waters.

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Old 07-08-2010, 06:31 PM   #9
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You can sometimes find old 171 Mako's for a good price, just check for wood rod. Late 1990's had Gel Coat problems. Harder to find a Whaler for a good price, good boat though. Gordon makes a great 18 Waterman, ride like a dream, but on the high side. Have you tried boattrader.com?

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Old 07-09-2010, 12:36 AM   #10
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If you're going to be cruising around the coast, even in relatively sheltered waters, I'd recommend getting something that will get you back safely if the water gets choppy in the afternoon. A boat used only on ponds, and a boat for the ocean (even if protected), are two different things. If you're going to be on the ocean, I'd recommend one of the following hull shapes: deep-V, modified-V, and cathedral. A cathedral hull is what you'll find on Whalers and their knock-offs. Deep-Vs are more like bass boats. Modified-Vs are typical skiff hull shapes. I'd stay away from the flat-bottom hulls, because they don't cut into the water enough to go in a straight line when it's windy and choppy. Also, you might want to bump up the hp you're looking at: a 25 hp motor can still cruise around at a slow, comfortable speed, but you have that extra power if you need it, especially if you've got a couple people on board and some gear and the weather turns. It will probably be more fuel efficient at slower speeds, as opposed to a 10 hp going the same speed. I'm not sure if there's a 10 hp limit on the local ponds, though. There are tons of boats out there, too many to recommend. I've got a 1952 Cadillac aluminum skiff ($400) w/ a 28 hp Evinrude for cruising around Narragansett Bay in RI.

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