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Old 07-13-2011, 01:50 AM   #61
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We're lacking here in BBQ, but there are some awesome places in the city. Brooklyn has a place called Fette Sau that's supposed to be amazing, but I haven't had a chance to get there.

I know how the water pan works, I was just hoping to get some flavor from the boiled off beer. Do you think it gives any at all?

Do you use the same mop for sauce as you do for basting with apple juice or whatever?

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Old 07-13-2011, 02:27 AM   #62
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I know people who swear by flavoring the water pan but I figure it's better to directly apply it to the meat rather than rely on some arcane system of evaporation and condensation (we'll making Q here not liquor).

Mop is the southern word for baste. Apple juice and vinegar are the base. Use your imagination to add your own twist. I like to switch to balsamic vinegar later to get a little sugar char.

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Old 07-13-2011, 12:00 PM   #63
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I love balsamic, thanks for that tip. I'm definitely going to try that next time.

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Old 07-13-2011, 01:29 PM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuporMan View Post
I know people who swear by flavoring the water pan but I figure it's better to directly apply it to the meat rather than rely on some arcane system of evaporation and condensation (we'll making Q here not liquor).
I agree. My insulated Spicewine box smoker has a water pan and I never use it. If you use a water pan you are just steaming the meat and adding flavor by adding things to the water in the water pan doesn't really work very well. If you use a water pan you might as well just use a crock pot and add liquid smoke......yuk!!!!!!!
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Old 07-13-2011, 01:38 PM   #65
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195-200F is pretty hot in my book. Is that for pulled pork? I prefer sliced and usually stop at 160-165F.

Pork (not BBQ pork) is quite safe with a slightly pink center. Pork tenderloin with a slightly pink center is one of best things on Earth (and at a bargain price).
Brisket cooked to 160 to 165 is going to be awful tuff. The whole idea behind cooking brisket is to bring it up to about 190 slowly to break down the colegens that make a brisket such a tuff piece of meat. In competition I pull brisket at 200* and rest it. I have competed and done well in brisket for over 7 years now.

If you don't believe me here is an excerpt from the Pickled Pig's forum on How to cook championship brisket. The Pickled Pig does very well on the BBQ circuit. (http://www.bbqbug.com/forums/bbq-con...n-brisket.html)

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The primary tool for knowing when it’s done is the temperature probe. A brisket can be “done” anywhere between 190-205F internal temperature (probe the thickest part of the flat). For us, most briskets are between 195-200F when done. Taking the internal temperature of the brisket is only a guide though; you’ll know the brisket is optimally “done” when the probe slides in and out your meat without resistance. It should feel like a knife going through butter. If you’re just getting started and don’t know what that feeling is like, pull it off at 197F internal and it should be fine.
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Old 07-14-2011, 04:56 AM   #66
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I was referring to this post about pork butts:

Quote: Originally Posted by Sawdustguy
I second what Dfess1 says. Pork butts are very forgiving. I would highly recommend you get yourself a good meat thermometer. You want to make sure you get that butt above 160*. I know the new rule is 140* but I think it is better to be safe. Uncooked pork is dangerous. You optimumly want the pork butt to get up to about 195* to 200* internal.


I've only made a couple briskets, but yeah, a brisket at 160F would be an ugly thing. But with pork butts I like to pull them right after that plateau around 160F breaks and temperature starts climbing again (I try to get it around 165F). But in my experience, when you go over 180F, you start to get into pulled pork territory. I much prefer sliced pork that still maintains good juiciness.

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Old 07-14-2011, 02:33 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuporMan View Post
I've only made a couple briskets, but yeah, a brisket at 160F would be an ugly thing. But with pork butts I like to pull them right after that plateau around 160F breaks and temperature starts climbing again (I try to get it around 165F). But in my experience, when you go over 180F, you start to get into pulled pork territory. I much prefer sliced pork that still maintains good juiciness.
I agree. I have had success slicing the money muscle at 200* but if you want to guarranty slices I totally agree 175* to 180* maximum.

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Old 07-14-2011, 02:34 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuporMan View Post
I've only made a couple briskets, but yeah, a brisket at 160F would be an ugly thing. But with pork butts I like to pull them right after that plateau around 160F breaks and temperature starts climbing again (I try to get it around 165F). But in my experience, when you go over 180F, you start to get into pulled pork territory. I much prefer sliced pork that still maintains good juiciness.
I agree. I have had success slicing the money muscle at 200* but if you want to guarranty slices I totally agree 185* maximum.

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