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Home Brew Forums > Food and Beverage > Meat Smoking, Curing and Sausage Making > brisket
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Old 12-13-2010, 10:07 PM   #1
crash1292
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Default brisket

I made a brisket and it turned out tender and tasty
first I marinaded it in a mix of jerky seasoning and a couple of home brew pale ale for about 4 hours.
then I put it on my smoker using charcoal briquettes for a hour.
then into a 200 deg oven for about 12 hours,until internal temp was 185 deg f.
let cool, cut up and pig out
not too smoky and tender

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Old 12-14-2010, 04:12 PM   #2
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I too am a fan of using the oven for long controlled slow and low, I use mesquite or some strong wood for an hour or 2 top get lots of smoke over the short time.

I usually do the oven first and finish with smoke, though.

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Old 12-14-2010, 04:22 PM   #3
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I love Smoking so even though the oven is great for consistent temps, if you can get a nice smoker that is insulated, there is nothing better than letting the brisket come out with a smoke ring.

Now that I think about it, I think i need to plan something for this weekend.

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Old 12-14-2010, 04:26 PM   #4
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I bought a propane smoker for those long, consistent smoke sessions. It's come in handy so many times I couldn't even count them, especially since I smoke multiple briskets for our parties and my wife usually has the oven used up all day anyway. Speaking of which, I need to find a good local butcher before Saturday, going to smoke 3 briskets on a mix of applewood and mesquite. I can't wait!

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Old 12-14-2010, 04:45 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by cheezydemon3 View Post
I too am a fan of using the oven for long controlled slow and low, I use mesquite or some strong wood for an hour or 2 top get lots of smoke over the short time.

I usually do the oven first and finish with smoke, though.
It really is best to smoke first though. The meat can only take in the smoke flavor at the start of the cooking process. After that it is just flavoring the outside pretty much.
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Old 12-14-2010, 05:26 PM   #6
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It really is best to smoke first though. The meat can only take in the smoke flavor at the start of the cooking process. After that it is just flavoring the outside pretty much.

+1 Smoker first. The meat only absorbs smoke when the meat is cool. If you do it backwards you're basically making a charred roast, not BBQ. Might as well finish it on your Weber.
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Old 12-14-2010, 06:06 PM   #7
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+1 on smoking first. I can hold my temps without much ado and frequently wrap the brisket in tin foil after 4 hours (fat 50-75% rendered) to preserve the juices in the meat.

If emphasizing the pink smoke ring I leave open but add a pan of water nearest intake for steam/moisture.

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Old 12-14-2010, 10:42 PM   #8
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Another +1 on smoke first. Smoke is mostly absorbed in the first few hours. To speed things up smoke for a few hours then wrap in foil and throw in the oven.

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Old 12-14-2010, 11:14 PM   #9
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Another +1 on smoke first. Smoke is mostly absorbed in the first few hours. To speed things up smoke for a few hours then wrap in foil and throw in the oven.
This is how I do my ribs and they always come out fantastic!
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Old 12-14-2010, 11:54 PM   #10
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Default Competition Brisket the "Two Fat Polocks BBQ Team" style

I compete in BBQ competitions. We have always done extremely well in Brisket. Here is what we do to prepare a competition Brisket. I always try to get CAB (Certified Angus Beef) briskets because CAB briskets are marked with the slaughter date. I have found through experimentation that aging the meat for two weeks post slaughter makes for a very tender brisket.

I always inject briskets to get a little more flavor in the brisket, but most importantly to get some of the phospates back in the meat that were lost when the animal died. The two injection mixes I use are Kosmos Q or FAB B Lite.

I only smoke full packers, that is a brisket where the point and flat are still connected. We never trim the fat cap, we only remove the thick layer of fat in the middle of the point so the brisket flattens. We slather some yellow mustard on the brisket to act like a glue for the rub (don't worry, you will never taste it). There are a number of rubs we use, but my favorite is The Slabs "Wow Up Your Cow". It gives a good flavor with a little bite and why reinvent the wheel by making our own rub. We do have our own rub, but I like The Slabs.

We prepare our smoker to smoke at 225* (it's gonna take some time) and smoke with Cherry and Apple woods. We have a number of smokers. We have a Lang 84 stick burner, (2) Extra Large Big Green eggs and a Spicewine Medium Insulated Smoker. For Brisket the Spicewine is the smoker of choice because it burns charcoal and allows us to use wood chunks. We do this because we add only enough wood to smoke for about 3 hours. Over smoking can cause your brisket to take on a bitter taste. You also do not want any white smoke if you can help it. We are looking for light sweet blue smoke. We allow the meat to cook to 185*. As you are cooking please do not open the smoker every 10 minutes to look at the meat, remember, "if your look'in, you ain't cook'in".

When the brisket is at 185* we remove it from the smoker, place the brisket on some aluminum foil and add a little more rub. We cover the brisket in foil and place it in a well insulated cooler (we use a cambro) and let it rest for an hour or two. The Brisket will continue to cook in the cooler and the finishing temperature should be between 195* and 200*, the perfect temperature range.

When we have finished resting the brisket, we collect the liquid and mix it with a little FAB B Lite and warm it up to make an Au Jus. We place the brisket slices (no thicker or thinner than a pencil width) in a garnished turn box and brush on some Au Jus. The Au Jus will make the brisket glisten and add quite a bit of flavor. No sauce for brisket in our camp.

This will get you beefy, moist and tender brisket every time, competition style. Anyone for a throw-down?



PS: We always take our slices from the flat. We also like to give ourselves every advantage to win so we always give the judges a treat in our turn-in box to go along with our slices. We separate the point and flat and chop up the point (we use the point because it is usually loaded with fat) into small cubes. We re-season the cubes and smother them with BBQ sauce. They go back into the smoker and we raise the temperature as high as we can. We cook the chit out of them (when this meat is over cooked it get very tender). When you remove them you will have the tastiest "Burnt Ends". The Judges love them.

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