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Old 01-19-2013, 04:53 PM   #1
KaYs3r
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Default What heatting element to use?

Hi guys,

I hope this is the right place for my question.

I'm starting to build my own e-BIAB system, and I don't know what heatting element is needded.

Is the one in the attachment enough? It has 1500W 220V

Thanks

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Old 01-19-2013, 07:24 PM   #2
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1500 watts would work for smaller ~3 gallon batches, but would probably be a little slow. The most popular 240v elements are these ones, but you'll need to make sure you circuit is 30 amps or more to handle the power required by a 5500 watt element. This element boils 10 gallon batches without a problem.

I guess the question for you is what are your intentions for batch size and what are your kettle and electrical limitations?

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Old 01-19-2013, 08:47 PM   #3
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Its for an 8 US gallon brew, so i guess I need more power. What would be the minimum ?

Thanks

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Old 01-19-2013, 10:34 PM   #4
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I would say about 3000 watts would be your absolute minimum. Would you not be able to do use the element I posted? You could use a similar 4500 watt element, those are pretty popular too. Again what are your electrical limitations?

Try this guide for heating time.

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Old 01-20-2013, 12:38 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcm_rx7 View Post
I would say about 3000 watts would be your absolute minimum. Would you not be able to do use the element I posted? You could use a similar 4500 watt element, those are pretty popular too. Again what are your electrical limitations?

Try this guide for heating time.
It won't fit horizontally, will it work vertically on one side?
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Old 01-20-2013, 01:14 AM   #6
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You could install it vertically but you would need to cover the element with liquid to prevent issues.
How about a shorter element at 10" ? You could always use 3 of the elements you originally posted.

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Old 01-20-2013, 10:43 AM   #7
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The ones you told me are a lot cheapper then mine.
What it the difference between Ultra low watt density and High watt density?

Thanks

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Old 01-22-2013, 12:16 AM   #8
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That refers to the amount of heat put out in a given surface area on the element. The idea is that a shorter element gets much hotter in order to transfer the same amount of heat a longer element would. This could be important if you plan to run the element while mashing, it could possibly scorch the grain/wort.

The element that is folded back and wavy allows it to be longer and have more surface area to transfer the heat to the liquid, which should reduce the chance of scorching or having hot spots.

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