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Old 04-08-2011, 06:20 PM   #1
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Default What do I do with this "extra" green wire?

So I'm putting together a simple electric brewery and noticing my heating elements have two connections, but then I have an extra green wire from the power source. Do I understand this correctly, that the green wire (ground, obv.) needs to be fastened to my kettle?

That makes sense, but before I plug anything in, I'm double checking here.

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-JP

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Old 04-08-2011, 06:22 PM   #2
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Okay, so THAT is what stickied posts are for... for to be read!

Indeed, my pot must be grounded.

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Old 04-08-2011, 06:22 PM   #3
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Whoah there cowboy, first you gotta answer a few questions.

110v or 220v?
What is the green wire connected to on the other end?

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Old 04-08-2011, 06:30 PM   #4
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120 volt. The other end of the wire will be plugged into a GFCI outlet.

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Old 04-08-2011, 06:41 PM   #5
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Ok, reason I ask is that sometimes with 220v that green wire is neutral, not ground. Anyway, yes with 110, the hot and neutral connect to the posts on the element and the ground must connect to the vessels and any other conductive parts that have the possibility of being energized.

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Old 04-08-2011, 06:42 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPicasso View Post
120 volt. The other end of the wire will be plugged into a GFCI outlet.
Into the GROUND connection of a GFCI outlet, I hope?
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:57 PM   #7
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Quote:
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Into the GROUND connection of a GFCI outlet, I hope?
OH c'mon now, it's a silly, basic question, and I might be an idiot, but not a complete moron.

Yes, 120V. Green is ground.
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Old 04-08-2011, 07:10 PM   #8
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Quote:
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Ok, reason I ask is that sometimes with 220v that green wire is neutral, not ground. Anyway, yes with 110, the hot and neutral connect to the posts on the element and the ground must connect to the vessels and any other conductive parts that have the possibility of being energized.
Expand on this 220V green neutral comment. Ive never heard of this before...

As my understanding is correct on a 220 circuit the only time a neutral is needed is for 120v controls of the 220v device. I just don't understand to why it would be used as a neutral that kinda goes against standard practice. I mess with 480V daily with an industrial environment and not much 220v. But I tend to think I know a good bit about ac electrical and never have heard of this. I'm not saying your false just looking to learn something new...
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Old 04-08-2011, 07:21 PM   #9
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Careful when throwing around the term "grounding wire". The green wire with the 120V system is most likely the "bonding wire" or "equipment grounding wire". If you trace the green wire from your outlets back to your distribution panel they should tie into the neutral bus. From there the neutral bus then gets "grounded". By running that bonding wire it ensure that your circuit breakers will function properly incase there is a fault. That way you don't have a shocking experience and you live to brew another day!

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Old 04-08-2011, 07:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxkling View Post
Expand on this 220V green neutral comment. Ive never heard of this before...

As my understanding is correct on a 220 circuit the only time a neutral is needed is for 120v controls of the 220v device. I just don't understand to why it would be used as a neutral that kinda goes against standard practice. I mess with 480V daily with an industrial environment and not much 220v. But I tend to think I know a good bit about ac electrical and never have heard of this. I'm not saying your false just looking to learn something new...
All I know is, I run my system off a 3 wire 220v outlet, it has two hot, and a neutral. Most newer homes are built with 4 wire 220v plugs, so there is an opportunity for confusion on which wire does what, when you're just looking at the color of the insulation. Don't trust the color, trace it back and find out what it's connected to.
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