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Old 03-06-2012, 03:20 AM   #1
WPStrassburg
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Default Variable resistance SSR for boil control?

Would this work as a boil control? Do you need a voltage to the pot or relay or does the relay sense the resistance of the pot?
What would the cycle time be? Is the 47 to 70 Hz the input power range? Cheap boil control would be nice!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1pc-KYOTTO-A...item20b9aba410

http://www.kyotto.com/PDF/PDF/KR2010AX.pdf



KYOTTO AC Solid State Variable Relay

SSR

Part No. : KR2040AX

AC Load out : 24-280VAC 47-70Hz 40A

Resistance control in : 0-500KΩ

CE safety

1 set = SSR + φ24mm 500KΩ B type potentiometer

+ 0-100% soft plastic panel (with glue)

made by KYOTTO, in Taiwan

dimension : 58.0x44.0x22.0mm, LxWxH

Scwer type In Out terminal

Net weight approx : 117g, 1 set

Each bidding lot is for 1 set

N290 0.65 28 20111007+60g+20g

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Old 03-06-2012, 03:53 AM   #2
chuckjaxfl
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I think that if you used the pot as you have it shown, you'll just have a point below which the SSR will be "open" and a point on the dial above which it will be "closed", just a switch without any control. The SSR is just a switch. It is either open or closed, it's not like a faucet that has a "half way open" setting. Control over your boil is achieved by the percentage of the time the element is on. I.E., on a 5 second system, 20% would be 1 second on, 4 seconds off. 70% would be 3.5 seconds on, 1.5 seconds off.

The cheap route that some are using to achieve what you are trying to do us to use this PWM with a minor modification in conjunction with the SSR. Check out this thread as well.

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Old 03-06-2012, 11:36 AM   #3
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A SSR is always on or off - think of it as a light switch. So if you want 50% heat it has to switch on and off, on and off continuously with it being on 50% of the time. That's what a PWM controller does.

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Old 03-06-2012, 12:16 PM   #4
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I understand the function of the ssr and pmw, but this is switching the ssr on/off on what seems to be a resistance signal. How I don't know though. What are the chances that this ssr already has the pmw signal built into it and just has the pot to adjust the on time?

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Old 03-06-2012, 12:55 PM   #5
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I know some who use one like that. It should work like a pwm, it uses the load power for the control circuitry somehow. I don't think it uses zero volt switching.

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Old 03-06-2012, 01:27 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WPStrassburg View Post
I understand the function of the ssr and pmw, but this is switching the ssr on/off on what seems to be a resistance signal. How I don't know though. What are the chances that this ssr already has the pmw signal built into it and just has the pot to adjust the on time?
You can make a zero crossing SSR act like a light dimmer but it's going to take a lot more than a potentiometer to make it work. You will need the potentiometer, a diode bridge network and a couple of resistors to divide the line voltage down to the range the SSR is designed to switch at. But the adjustment will be non-linear.

Also, you will be switching the element on & off at 120 times a second but I don't know if this matters.
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Old 03-06-2012, 01:28 PM   #7
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that is amazing, I have never seen a pot-driven SSR before. WOW. too bad I just ordered from Auber. I wonder if that really works?

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Old 03-06-2012, 01:50 PM   #8
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Interesting find! After looking through the spec sheet, I think it will work as you intend it to. Regular SSR's use a small control voltage to control the output but this one apparently has enough other circuitry built in to allow an external pot to adjust the output. For no more than it costs, I'd say it's worth a try! Please report back on your findings if you do - this may be a simple, effective solution.

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Old 03-06-2012, 02:06 PM   #9
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These have just recently started showing up as sellers understood what we are using them for. I would still pay a little extra for zero crossing.

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Old 03-06-2012, 05:07 PM   #10
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Has anyone seen where it says zero crossing or not? I haven't seen a definate one way or the other, but would prefer teh zero crossing as well. One of the sites with them listed mentions zero crossing or random as an option, but doesn't say what indicated one vs the other.

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