Last days to enter the BrewHardware Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > Thoughts on Element Size - 5-10 gallon
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-10-2012, 05:25 PM   #1
Jps101
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 87
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default Thoughts on Element Size - 5-10 gallon

All,

Like most of use here, I have been doing my homework and realize there are a number of differing opinions on this topic. My question is what has been your experience and what would you do? For discussion purposes, lets not concern ourselves with circuit size. That said if you would be doing mostly eBIAB 5 gallon batches, what size element do you think is enough? However, if you wanted to give yourself the ability to scale up to 10 gallon, would this change your mind? Now to bring in cost. 6g wire is 2x 10g wire, does that further change your thought process. Thank you in advance to any and all comments. I seem to learn (or at least have another thought) each time I read another build. Kal and P-J, you two have certainly been a great deal of assistance to many on this forum - thank you for your contributions.

__________________
Jps101 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-10-2012, 05:32 PM   #2
ryan_george
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Fergus, Ontario
Posts: 231
Liked 21 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I would generally be inclined to max-out whatever circuit you have available for brewing. This will give you the fastest heat-up times and could offer flexibility to move to larger batches.
Since you refer to 10 ga wire, the most obvious solution would be to run on a 30 A circuit, use 10 ga wire, and use a 4500-5500 W element.

__________________
ryan_george is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-10-2012, 05:57 PM   #3
Jps101
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 87
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Ryan,

Thanks for the input. I know I referenced 10g wire, that may have been a bit misleading. I have the ability to go to 50a, which would require 6g wire, but that stuff is expensive and I would need to run about 50 ft of the stuff to get close to where I am brewing now. Not to mention the additional plugs and an additional cord to the control panel. The other part being, seems if I am on 30a breaker, I cannot do much more than run a 5500 element...right?

__________________
Jps101 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-10-2012, 05:57 PM   #4
kpr121
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kpr121's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,867
Liked 69 Times on 65 Posts
Likes Given: 93

Default

The highest wattage you can possibly afford and safely install in your brew room.

__________________
ADD ME on GOOGLE+
Primary: Nugget Nectar 2014
Kegged:

Bottled:
Bulk Aging:
Up Next: ???? Suggestions?
kpr121 is online now
passedpawn Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-10-2012, 05:59 PM   #5
kpr121
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kpr121's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,867
Liked 69 Times on 65 Posts
Likes Given: 93

Default

In your particular situation I would say to go with 30A. A 5500 watt element is more than enough for 10 gallons. And you will get 5 gallons to boil in no time while you are contemplating stepping up to 10 gallons.

__________________
ADD ME on GOOGLE+
Primary: Nugget Nectar 2014
Kegged:

Bottled:
Bulk Aging:
Up Next: ???? Suggestions?
kpr121 is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-10-2012, 06:04 PM   #6
ryan_george
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Fergus, Ontario
Posts: 231
Liked 21 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kpr121 View Post
In your particular situation I would say to go with 30A. A 5500 watt element is more than enough for 10 gallons. And you will get 5 gallons to boil in no time while you are contemplating stepping up to 10 gallons.
Yes, I agree!
__________________
ryan_george is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 02:14 AM   #7
Jps101
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 87
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Thanks for the thoughts.

__________________
Jps101 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 02:24 AM   #8
skwieland
Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
skwieland's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 26
Liked 3 Times on 1 Posts

Default

1KW = 3450 BTU/Hour
1BTU = Raising 1 pound of water 1 degree F
now add time and heat loss from your vessel

easy

So a 5500 watt element is 5.5kwor 18,766 btu/hr

10 gal of water weighs 84 pounds, raise from 55F to 210F or a deltaT raise of 155F which is 13,020 BTU plus the weight of your vessel

So basically with a 5500 watt element you or about 42 minutes plus time to heat your pot, and the heat coming off the sides and loss of the top, or about 60 minutes total assuming a normal open pot.

clear as mud?

less WATTS = more time

I know guys using 2500 watt elements... but they are in no rush :-)

__________________
skwieland is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2012, 05:13 AM   #9
Jps101
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 87
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by skwieland View Post
1KW = 3450 BTU/Hour
1BTU = Raising 1 pound of water 1 degree F
now add time and heat loss from your vessel

easy

So a 5500 watt element is 5.5kwor 54,614 btu/hr

10 gal of water weighs 84 pounds, raise from 55F to 210F or a deltaT raise of 155F which is 13,020 BTU plus the weight of your vessel

So basically with a 5500 watt element you or about 15 minutes plus time to heat your pot, and the heat coming off the sides and loss of the top, or about 30 minutes total assuming a normal open pot.

clear as mud?

less WATTS = more time

I know guys using 2500 watt elements... but they are in no rush :-)
Steve,

Great explanation...thanks for having an opinion.
__________________
Jps101 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2012, 11:41 PM   #10
Shockerengr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 442
Liked 20 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by skwieland View Post
1KW = 3450 BTU/Hour
1BTU = Raising 1 pound of water 1 degree F
now add time and heat loss from your vessel

easy

So a 5500 watt element is 5.5kwor 54,614 btu/hr

10 gal of water weighs 84 pounds, raise from 55F to 210F or a deltaT raise of 155F which is 13,020 BTU plus the weight of your vessel

So basically with a 5500 watt element you or about 15 minutes plus time to heat your pot, and the heat coming off the sides and loss of the top, or about 30 minutes total assuming a normal open pot.

clear as mud?

less WATTS = more time

I know guys using 2500 watt elements... but they are in no rush :-)
Math's not adding up... 5.5kw x 3450btu/hr/kw = 18,975btu/hr so I'm not sure where ~55,000btu/hr is coming from
__________________
Shockerengr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kettle size versus heater element size Hound Electric Brewing 6 03-22-2013 12:29 AM
Choosing the right size element Blowntri5 Electric Brewing 13 12-27-2011 09:27 PM
heating element thread size wegz15 Electric Brewing 8 07-29-2011 11:39 PM
What size Oring for heater element? bad coffee Electric Brewing 4 04-01-2011 03:39 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS