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Old 10-12-2010, 11:44 PM   #1
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Default Source for 20 Amp, 240 V Toggle switches

Looking for 20 Amp, 240 V Toggle switches. illuminated if possible, to switch off my 3500 and 4500 watt heating elements. I am using regular electrical switches for this now, and want to get something a little better to panel mount on my control panel.

I looked at Automation Direct and didn't see anything.

Thanks

Bill

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Old 10-13-2010, 12:02 AM   #2
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http://www.amazon.com/Toggle-Switch-...sr=8-1-catcorr
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:39 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsors View Post
Looking for 20 Amp, 240 V Toggle switches. illuminated if possible, to switch off my 3500 and 4500 watt heating elements. I am using regular electrical switches for this now, and want to get something a little better to panel mount on my control panel.

I looked at Automation Direct and didn't see anything.

Thanks

Bill
I don't know where you live, but there should be an electrical supply house in your area that carries such stuff.
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:18 PM   #4
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Thanks for the replies. Now if I can find one that is illuminated to save the separate LED light.

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Old 10-13-2010, 01:35 PM   #5
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Is this just for heat sticks? Or do you have them running on SSRs? If SSR control, switch the low voltage trigger lines.

Else, make damn sure those switches are grounded...

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Old 10-13-2010, 02:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boerderij_Kabouter View Post
Is this just for heat sticks? Or do you have them running on SSRs? If SSR control, switch the low voltage trigger lines.

Else, make damn sure those switches are grounded...
Not the OP but....

Wow, I never would have considered that! The simple solutions evade me!
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Old 10-13-2010, 02:47 PM   #7
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Again thanks for the great suggestions.

They are to disconnect the power to SSR controlled elements. However, I am only using one SSR per element to control one leg of the power and that's why I want a switch to cut power to both power legs.

I may consider adding a second SSR for each element and then I can cut the low voltage side. I have heard that if SSR's fail, they fail in the closed position, so that is another reason why i was planning to switch the high voltage side. Don't know if that is true or not, just what I heard (I believe on HBT)

And absolutely they will be grounded.

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Old 10-13-2010, 02:52 PM   #8
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I would add the second SSR. For killing power, an E-stop button is a very good idea, in case of emergency...

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Old 10-13-2010, 03:04 PM   #9
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If this is an 'emergency' kill type think then why not go with a circuit breaker mounted in an easily accessed location? Or, better, ground fault protector?

I have seen ssr's 'pop open'.

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Old 10-13-2010, 03:05 PM   #10
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OK. I did buy an E-Stop push button and a contactor rated to handle all of the power coming into to the control panel and is part of my build.

The main feed in my house panle is from a 50 Amp GFIC breaker, so that is protected.

My original question was limited strictly to cutting power to the individual elements, not as an E-stop. That is a separate deal as described above..

A little off my topic, but I am planning on having 2 boxes. One for High voltage and one for low voltage. There will be some mixing since my PID's need 120 V and I thought I would put the 12 V and 24V transformers in the low voltage box with the PID's, temp probe connectors, selector switches, flow and float switch connectors. The SSR's, contactor, relays, power to the elements and pumps in the high voltage box.

My reasoning for doing this is the limitations of the sizes of the boxes I have and trying to minimize EMF (or whatever that is)

Any thoughts ?

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