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-   -   So who's worked in their main electrical panel? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/so-whos-worked-their-main-electrical-panel-385368/)

WroxBrew 02-05-2013 07:33 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtmaus View Post
As an electrician I do this everyday. It's not that big of a deal. Kill the main breaker, test to make sure it killed the power and don't touch the main feed coming in as it's still hot. Be careful and good luck with your project
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannylerch View Post
I am an electrician in the film industry. We tie in to breaker boxes all the time. Remember, amps kill not voltage. Plug in power in this order. Green(Ground), White(Neutral), Red, Blue, Black. Always end the sequence with your hot legs. Make sure you don't have a knee on the ground, make sure you are wearing rubber soled shoes, make sure your feet aren't wet. ETC, basically you don't want your body to complete the circuit. If you have any doubts, hire a professional, preferably an electrician who is in a union. Because if they aren't union, they are probably a hack.
All good advice.

Here's a pic of my succesfull panel job. I've been running it for over six months now without any issues (no popped breakers with 2 heaters sometimes running simultaniously). My furnace and hot water heater are gas fired. Make sure you know your whole house load.

whoaru99 02-16-2013 03:05 PM

4 Attachment(s)

Not sure it will matter but let's try this...

As can be seen, there is no practical difference in the shock to the person regardless if they are the only load, in series with a large load, or in parallel with a large load. The numbers are rounded for simplicity.

Did not include low draw (high resistance/impedance) loads to illustrate that effect because the (false) assertion is that the larger the load the worse the shock, and we can see that's simply not the case.


whoaru99 02-16-2013 03:05 PM

4 Attachment(s)

Not sure it will matter but let's try this...

As can be seen, there is no practical difference in the shock to the person regardless if they are the only load, in series with a large load, or in parallel with a large load. The numbers are rounded for simplicity.

Did not include low draw (high resistance/impedance) loads to illustrate that effect because the (false) assertion is that the larger the load the worse the shock, and we can see that's simply not the case.


whoaru99 02-16-2013 03:05 PM

4 Attachment(s)

Not sure it will matter but let's try this...

As can be seen, there is no practical difference in the shock to the person regardless if they are the only load, in series with a large load, or in parallel with a large load. The numbers are rounded for simplicity.

Did not include low draw (high resistance/impedance) loads to illustrate that effect because the (false) assertion is that the larger the load the worse the shock, and we can see that's simply not the case.


whoaru99 02-16-2013 03:05 PM

4 Attachment(s)

Not sure it will matter but let's try this...

As can be seen, there is no practical difference in the shock to the person regardless if they are the only load, in series with a large load, or in parallel with a large load. The numbers are rounded for simplicity.

Did not include low draw (high resistance/impedance) loads to illustrate that effect because the (false) assertion is that the larger the load the worse the shock, and we can see that's simply not the case.


beaksnbeer 03-30-2013 09:12 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by thadius856
100A 120V continuous draw for me at my poor people power rate of 10.06c/KwH would be $10,575 per year.

However, I get a discount off retail price. A good chunk of my pay is tied up in "allowances", which aren't counted or taxable a "income". As such, I'm locked into a no-tier system (as is much of the state's residents). Retail prices are scary, built off a baseline tiered system.

Baseline (Up to baseline) $0.13 per kWh
Tier 2 (101%-130%) $0.15 per kWh
Tier 3 (131%-200%) $0.30 per kWh
Tier 4 (201%-300%) $0.34 per kWh
Tier 5 (>300%) $0.34 per kWh

Last month's baseline as shown on my bill was 384 kWh. We'll pretend that's the average for the year.

120V 100A continuous is 12 kWh per hour, or 105,120 kWh per year. Hence...

Baseline (Up to baseline) $0.13 per kWh - first 4608 kWh costs $599.04 (100,512 kWh to go)
Tier 2 (101%-130%) $0.15 per kWh - next 1382.4 kWh costs $207.36 (99,129.6 kWh to go)
Tier 3 (131%-200%) $0.30 per kWh - next 3225.6 kWh costs $967.98 (95,904 kWh to go)
Tier 4 (201%-300%) $0.34 per kWh - next 4608 kWh costs $1,566.72 (91,296 kWh to go)
Tier 5 (>300%) $0.34 per kWh - remaining 91,296 kWh costs $31,040.64 (all done)

For a grand total of... $34,381.74 per year.

Funny thing is, that's for 100 amp service. Many nearby houses have 200A service, and it's not uncommon to see 3000+ sq ft houses on 400 amp service.

Edit: Total was 686 kWh for 32 days billed, which is 21.44 kWh per day, or 893 watts average continuous. Think I need to go around and turn off some more lights...
Damn, my house is 1600 sq ft 5 fridges/freezers + spa here's mine over 1/2 my bill is fuel charges

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