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Old 04-29-2013, 05:22 PM   #11
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Please don't take this as rude, but if you don't know how to wire a standard receptacle and don't know what a jockey box is, I very very very highly encourage you to do a ton of learning before endeavoring to wire a 220v 30 amp system as you are playing with levels of electricity that can easily kill.

A jockey box is a standard box used for bringing together electrical connections safely by protecting the wire connections. ...
I've been associated with the elctrical trade for more years than you have been around. I also have no clue what the "jockey box" you reference is.

Go easy. I recommend it.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:22 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Bensiff View Post
Please don't take this as rude, but if you don't know how to wire a standard receptacle and don't know what a jockey box is, I very very very highly encourage you to do a ton of learning before endeavoring to wire a 220v 30 amp system as you are playing with levels of electricity that can easily kill.

A jockey box is a standard box used for bringing together electrical connections safely by protecting the wire connections. If you take the plate cover off any electrical outlet in your house you will see a box behind it, that is a jockey box. Wiring a standard plug is pretty easy, the black is hot, the white neutral, and the copper the ground. On the back of a receptacle it is labeled (sometimes hard to see) white on one side and black on the other, at a corner is a green screw that is for the ground. Simply attach the wires powering the receptacle as labeled and you will be able to plug into pumps into it...but, again do your homework, know what you are doing, watch a ton of youtube videos for visuals, get a voltmeter and a digital or analogue voltage detector so you know the power is off and that you have the correct amount of power when wiring. Electricity is invisible, never guess, never assume, please be safe...ok done with my soapbox.
FWIW, I have never heard of an outlet box referred to as a jockey box, and a google search for jockey box does not show an outlet box, at least for the first few pages, before I gave up.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:23 PM   #13
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P-J beat me to it, lol.

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Old 04-29-2013, 05:31 PM   #14
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Ok, well I have not heard of that either. Thanks guys for chiming in.

Still my question is, how would I wire the GFCI plug which has two receptacles on it so I can run the two pumps off seperate 2-way switches?

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Old 04-29-2013, 05:48 PM   #15
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Ok, well I have not heard of that either. Thanks guys for chiming in.

Still my question is, how would I wire the GFCI plug which has two receptacles on it so I can run the two pumps off seperate 2-way switches?
It would be better to put the GFCI before the panel, so that all of the circuits are under GFCI protection. If a 120v panel, then put a GFCI outlet on the wall where you will plug the panel in. If 240v, same principle, but you would use either a GFCI breaker or a GFCI spa panel.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:00 PM   #16
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It would be better to put the GFCI before the panel, so that all of the circuits are under GFCI protection. If a 120v panel, then put a GFCI outlet on the wall where you will plug the panel in. If 240v, same principle, but you would use either a GFCI breaker or a GFCI spa panel.
Good point. If I am using a 30A 240V heating element, I would have to use the GFCI breaker or spa panel right? I don't plan on boiling water in my HLT but from what I have read, the element still might pull the full watage if something goes wrong.

Correct?
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:04 PM   #17
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I've been associated with the elctrical trade for more years than you have been around. I also have no clue what the "jockey box" you reference is.

Go easy. I recommend it.
Strange, must be a local thing that electricians I know use, that and j-box...just a junction box, but they use it as a catch all for any of their electrical boxes, whether a junction or a light switch.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:05 PM   #18
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It would be better to put the GFCI before the panel, so that all of the circuits are under GFCI protection. If a 120v panel, then put a GFCI outlet on the wall where you will plug the panel in. If 240v, same principle, but you would use either a GFCI breaker or a GFCI spa panel.
+1, everything needs to be protected with GFCI
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:13 PM   #19
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Good point. If I am using a 30A 240V heating element, I would have to use the GFCI breaker or spa panel right? I don't plan on boiling water in my HLT but from what I have read, the element still might pull the full watage if something goes wrong.

Correct?
Yes on the GFCI.

Also, the GFCI is there to protect life, and in that context it has nothing to do with how you are using the using the element.

Incidentally, the way a PID/SSR control an element is by cycling on and off, so when it is on it draws 100% current. The relative time on vs. off is how it maintains temperature.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:20 PM   #20
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Yes on the GFCI.

Also, the GFCI is there to protect life, and in that context it has nothing to do with how you are using the using the element.

Incidentally, the way a PID/SSR control an element is by cycling on and off, so when it is on it draws 100% current. The relative time on vs. off is how it maintains temperature.
Got it. That's what I thought. I have been lurking on a lot of posts by everyone that has posted on mine to try and become learned.

Would this female receptacle work? I wouldn't see why not for the heating element to plug into.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_246702-1571-...-30&facetInfo=
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