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-   -   Resistored vs non-resistored heating elements? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/resistored-vs-non-resistored-heating-elements-338837/)

Dgonza9 07-01-2012 01:31 AM

Resistored vs non-resistored heating elements?
 
I had a bit of scorching in my RIMS tube today. I'm switching to a tri-clover style attachment to more easily clean it. So I was looking for a new 1500w LWD element. Hoping for copper or stainless.

I found a few possibilities, then noticed some are "resistored" and others are "non-resistored."

Does anyone know what this means?

LINK to "NON-RESISTORED" element.

LINK to "RESISTORED" element

ClaudiusB 07-01-2012 05:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dgonza9 (Post 4216162)
I had a bit of scorching in my RIMS tube today. I'm switching to a tri-clover style attachment to more easily clean it. So I was looking for a new 1500w LWD element. Hoping for copper or stainless.

I found a few possibilities, then noticed some are "resistored" and others are "non-resistored."

Does anyone know what this means?

LINK to "NON-RESISTORED" element.

LINK to "RESISTORED" element

Resistored element prolongs water heater tank life

http://www.publicserviceplumbers.com/pdf/electric-brochure.pdf

Cheers,
ClaudiusB

Dgonza9 07-03-2012 03:33 AM

Thanks. Love to know what the mechanism of the preservation is, but oh well. Doesn't matter for my application.

Patricknobles 06-29-2013 08:38 PM

is there any difference is brewing with a resistored or non-resistored element?

AllanMar 06-29-2013 11:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patricknobles (Post 5313498)
is there any difference is brewing with a resistored or non-resistored element?

No, not really.

"Resistored" elements refer to the anode/coupling being resistored, not the heating element itself. By using a resistor to limit galvanic current the anode life can be extended. Pretty much a moot point for our application, although it may help a little with the face of the element rusting? (probably only if you use their resistored anode as well though) It is a Rheem thing, so you usually only see it offered by them.

If you care to, more details can be found in their patent(s):
http://www.google.com/patents/US7387713
https://www.google.com/patents/US4848616

ClaudiusB 06-30-2013 01:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanMar (Post 5313793)
No, not really.

"Resistored" elements refer to the anode/coupling being resistored, not the heating element itself.

If you care to, more details can be found in their patent(s):
http://www.google.com/patents/US7387713
https://www.google.com/patents/US4848616

Rheem's heating element does have a resistor mounted on the rear of the element to prevent premature failure of the the element by slowing down corrotion. Above link in my old post shows the resistored anode and heating element.

ClaudiusB 06-30-2013 02:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patricknobles (Post 5313498)
is there any difference is brewing with a resistored or non-resistored element?

Simple explanation.

A resistor mounted on the rear and the element sheathing is isolated from the tank wall.
Non resistored, no resistor and the element sheathing is connected to the tank wall when screwed in.

AllanMar 06-30-2013 12:02 PM

When I said "not the heating element itself" I meant the electrical element. As mentioned above the element sheath is resistored or "the coupling" as I was calling it.


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