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Old 07-24-2013, 12:04 PM   #21
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The cost difference per foot is 30-50 cents between 6 and 8 guage, I was saying pay for 6 gauge in case you ever want to run 50 amps.

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Old 07-24-2013, 12:24 PM   #22
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I was just saying if you run a 50 amp sub panel and you only have 50 amps. Just make sure to not exceed that in the subpanel while brewering.
Ok thats what i thought, just checking

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The cost difference per foot is 30-50 cents between 6 and 8 guage, I was saying pay for 6 gauge in case you ever want to run 50 amps.
Right, makes sense to future proof, although i really dont see why I would need that much. As I mentioned I don't plan on making more than 6 gallons at a time. I need electrical outlets for this quadrant of the basement anyways, which is the main reason i need wire run. If I only will need 30 amps for brewery side of things, it maybe be cheaper to buy the heavier wire and run 50amps to the spa panel and then have 2 20amp/120v circuits branch out of that for the basement power, which even then is more than i need. This would be opposed to running cable for the 30a/240v circuit and one 20 amp circuit. But looks like 6awg is rather pricey compared to 10.
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Old 07-24-2013, 12:43 PM   #23
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Edit1: The reason i was thinking 30a/250v is so I would be able to take the system with us if we move years down the road - easy connection to a dryer outlet.
If and when you move, are you likely to pick a house less conducive to your hobby? True, using any standard dryer outlet would be convenient, but brewing next to your dryer might not be. If you have such an eye towards your brewing habits at this house and at this stage, I would think future houses will only be more customizable towards brewing.

The wire is the cheapest part of your decision. Breakers/GFIs, outlets, and plugs are where the price rises as you incress your amperage. Consider running 6 AWG wire, because that is the hard and semi-permanent part. You can still size everything else at 30 AMP, but you could then very easily upgrade to 50 amps in the future. Just saying--what is hardwired in your house is the hard part to change. Swapping out breakers or outlets can be done by anyone. I am running a dedicated 60 amp GFI to a 60 amp outlet. From their I have a 60 amp plug on 4AWG wire going into my panel. From their I can accomplish nearly anything I want.
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Old 07-25-2013, 01:16 AM   #24
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The wire is the cheapest part of your decision. Breakers/GFIs, outlets, and plugs are where the price rises as you incress your amperage. Consider running 6 AWG wire, because that is the hard and semi-permanent part. You can still size everything else at 30 AMP, but you could then very easily upgrade to 50 amps in the future.
+1. This is what I did in my new basement brewery as well. My control panel is 30A/240V and while I don't ever envision going with the larger (50A) control panel I designed the cost difference between 10ga and 6ga isn't great so I had the electrician install 6ga. Just in case. The wall receptacle is still a standard 30A dryer outlet and the breaker is still a 2-pole 30A breaker.

Incidentally, you were asking about how 120V is split from 240V - my article on control panel supply power may be useful.

Good luck!

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Old 07-25-2013, 03:49 AM   #25
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Wow. Kal himself quoted me. My. Day. Has. Been. Made. The way I have poured over your site for 14 months has been close to idolatrous. Thanks for all you do.

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