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Old 01-08-2011, 04:06 AM   #11
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They were originally used in Xerox Copiers, these are leftovers from old copiers. I have a friend who repairs copiers for a living and he says they are quality. I am building my system now, so I have not tested the cable yet, but I know other members have used them.

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Old 01-08-2011, 04:57 AM   #12
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I have this cable...it's definately solid although I've never tested the GFCI yet.

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Old 03-09-2011, 08:54 PM   #13
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My apologies for reviving this old thread...but I've been contemplating a simple transition from propane to electric and thought the cable discussed above seemed like a simple solution.

I know very, very little about electricity (aside from the fact that it's incredibly dangerous)...so am I correct in assuming that this cable can be plugged into a standard 240v 30A dryer outlet and run directly into a 3500 watt element yielding a simple, safe, yet powerful e-keggle?

Someone tell me if I'm mistaken. I'm simply trying to educate myself before diving into this venture. Thanks in advance!

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Old 03-09-2011, 09:07 PM   #14
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I know very, very little about electricity (aside from the fact that it's incredibly dangerous)...so am I correct in assuming that this cable can be plugged into a standard 240v 30A dryer outlet and run directly into a 3500 watt element yielding a simple, safe, yet powerful e-keggle?
Essentially that's the idea. You should be able to go with a bigger element that 3500w if you have 30A available, you might want to go with 4000 or 5500.
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Old 03-09-2011, 10:38 PM   #15
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I wouldn't just plug the element in - You should have some form of control. A switch at the least, and PWM or PID of some sort at best.

The issue is that (depending on your batch size) even 3500 watts could keep you constantly chasing boilovers. With a switch you can turn it on and off to let the boil fall, and with PWM or a PID you can dial in just the right amount of power.

5500 watts is great for getting to a boil quickly. But it's way too much to hold the boil once you get there. Think of it like having your burner on full blast after a 5 gallon batch gets to boiling

The other thing you need to do is have GFCI protection. If that 30 amp circuit isn't used for anything else (Like a dryer) you can just replace the breaker in the panel with a GFCI. If it is used for other non-GFCI friendly appliances, you'll want to get a "Spa panel" with whips. This way you can plug the spa panel into the 30a recp. and plug the element control into the spa panel. 240 volts * 30 Amps + 13 gallons of water is a bad idea without adequate protection...

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What does the primary pressure gauge on the tank tell us? That's right, the temperature. Put it on a scale if you want to know how much is in it...
Put some duct tape over the gauge - Or better yet - Replace the high pressure gauge with a plug - High pressure gauges are useless!
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Old 03-10-2011, 04:20 AM   #16
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The other thing you need to do is have GFCI protection.
The eBay cord linked to in my prior post would provide the appropriate GFCI protection, right?? And a spa panel would provide that protection if I decided to go that route? I think I'd choose one of those two options rather than a GFCI breaker so I can keep the setup fairly mobile.

And you mention PWM and PID for "dialing in" the appropriate wattage...this would definitely be ideal...especially since it would allow me to use a more powerful element. I'll need to spend some more time on the boards trying to tack down just how these controller work instead of simply dismissing them from my list of potential options due to their current intimidation factor. Are there any elementary, start-from-scratch sort of tutorials that explain how these work and how they're assembled? Every mention of them that I've seen requires a good deal of electrical knowhow to comprehend. Thanks for the great info thus far!
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Old 03-10-2011, 01:35 PM   #17
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There are some great threads about using a PID for temperature control. I don't know of a tutorial, though.

Essentially, you would only need 3 components:
A PID - Get one that runs on 240 volts so you can power it from the same feed as the element uses
(2) SSRs - These are what actually switch the current to the element.

You wouldn't need a temperature probe since you would use the PID only in manual 0-100% mode. You could add one, however, if you decided to use it for controlling a RIMS or HERMs.

Don't be too intimidated by some of the builds in here - They are far more complicated than they need to be. What you need is really just one little piece of something like Kal's build.

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Originally Posted by Ecnerwal View Post
What does the primary pressure gauge on the tank tell us? That's right, the temperature. Put it on a scale if you want to know how much is in it...
Put some duct tape over the gauge - Or better yet - Replace the high pressure gauge with a plug - High pressure gauges are useless!
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Old 03-10-2011, 05:09 PM   #18
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The eBay cord linked to in my prior post would provide the appropriate GFCI protection, right?? And a spa panel would provide that protection if I decided to go that route? I think I'd choose one of those two options rather than a GFCI breaker so I can keep the setup fairly mobile.

And you mention PWM and PID for "dialing in" the appropriate wattage...this would definitely be ideal...especially since it would allow me to use a more powerful element. I'll need to spend some more time on the boards trying to tack down just how these controller work instead of simply dismissing them from my list of potential options due to their current intimidation factor. Are there any elementary, start-from-scratch sort of tutorials that explain how these work and how they're assembled? Every mention of them that I've seen requires a good deal of electrical knowhow to comprehend. Thanks for the great info thus far!

Yes the cord has the built in GFCI which is why I bought it. Great deal and that thing is BEEFY. You need a 4 prong dryer outlet though, the newer style.

I followed Kal's build to help me build mine a couple years ago, has worked out great.
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Old 03-10-2011, 07:09 PM   #19
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5500 watts is great for getting to a boil quickly. But it's way too much to hold the boil once you get there. Think of it like having your burner on full blast after a 5 gallon batch gets to boiling
Interesting... some people I talk to say you need at least 4000w, others say its overkill. My keg is out for welding, and I am still debating doing 2 1500w or 2 2000w, but was worried that won't be enough for 5 gallon batches and the odd 10g.

The spa panels with whips are likely the best solution for gfci that I can think of... especially if you are like me and work for a company that sells spas
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Old 03-10-2011, 09:03 PM   #20
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It depends on many factors, from how much power you have, how fast your BK bleeds BTU's, Altitude, and how long you're willing to wait.

You could boil 10 gallons with 2kw if you insulate the holy crap out of it and wait...

Once you get to boil, though, 5500 watts is a lot of power.

You point out another great option though - Use 2 2kw elements. Use both to get to boil, and cycle one on and off to control it. It could make it easier to hold a boil without having to build PID or PWM control. Look into the heat stick threads. There's a bunch of guys here using 2 2kw heat sticks for boiling.

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Originally Posted by Ecnerwal View Post
What does the primary pressure gauge on the tank tell us? That's right, the temperature. Put it on a scale if you want to know how much is in it...
Put some duct tape over the gauge - Or better yet - Replace the high pressure gauge with a plug - High pressure gauges are useless!
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