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Old 10-24-2010, 05:10 PM   #1
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Default Need help with my electrical diagram!!!

Hey Guys,

So im in the process of putting together a eHerms system. My kegs themselves are pretty much done, now its time to put together the electronics. Ive purchased most of the stuff but would like to get some feedback on this circuit before I actually begin.

This is a mix of TiberBrew and Kals posts...so a big thanks goes out to them and others who have helped along the way!

Circuit


****The red arrows are junctions which I am not confident about. Can these join or should they individually reach the BUS...???

Front Panel


Bottom Panel


Thanks!

Gabrew

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Old 10-24-2010, 05:22 PM   #2
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Random question... is your MLT PID controller connecting to anything? Also what is the purpose of having the SSR go into the contactor?

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Old 10-24-2010, 05:26 PM   #3
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The PID is only serves as a digital temp reader..there in case I ever choose to move onto a RIMS or any future changes/projects...

As for the ssr to the contactor...I>m not sure of the exact reason but this is the configuration I have seen on several similar circuits...

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Old 10-24-2010, 05:40 PM   #4
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Please allow me to weigh in on this.



Item #1 - This appears to be a key switch. What is your understanding of the purpose of this? This is a vital question.

Item #2 - You illustrate the element outlets as 3 wire units (phase 1, phase 2 and equipment ground) but you are running a neutral to them as well.

P-J

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Old 10-24-2010, 05:44 PM   #5
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Hey P-J

(hope you dont mind the fact that I frankensteined your diagram....)

#1: I really wasnt sure about that one. Basically I want a kill switch. Something that can be turned off between sessions.

#2: definately right! Its a three wire...thus I should remove the neutral...

Thanks!

Anythign else?

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Old 10-24-2010, 06:11 PM   #6
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I do not mind at all. I'm glad that it provides some help to you.

Please let me explain the intent of item #1 on Tiber's diagram. It is indeed a kill switch. It is setup as an Emergency Power Off and its function is absolutely dependent on having a GFCI mains breaker in your mains panel. There are 2 resistors in series with the switch that limit the current draw to 0.06 amps from line 2 to equipment ground. This leakage current will trip the GFCI instantly. BTW, I would not use a key switch. It should be a momentary contact - push button switch.

One other thing - You show a 3 position switch that controls the contactors for the heating elements. Based on the switch, you will be running only one element or the other at any given time. If this is the case, there is no need for 2 - 240V circuit breakers. One is more than adaquate.

As far as the SSR outputs feeding the contactors - this is done to remove all voltage from the kettles when power is not required. It is another huge safety requirement.

If I can be of any help to you, please let me know. When you get your layout close to what you want, I'd be glad to draw a final diagram for you.

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Old 10-24-2010, 06:12 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabrew View Post
Hey P-J

(hope you dont mind the fact that I frankensteined your diagram....)

#1: I really wasnt sure about that one. Basically I want a kill switch. Something that can be turned off between sessions.

#2: definately right! Its a three wire...thus I should remove the neutral...

Thanks!

Anythign else?
#1 seems like it wouldn't work as it is wired. I think it would just blow the fuse (as it shorts hot to ground). I think what you would want is a DPST key switch and connect the red and blue through each of the poles.
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Old 10-24-2010, 06:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P-J View Post
I do not mind at all. I'm glad that it provides some help to you.

Please let me explain the intent of item #1 on Tiber's diagram. It is indeed a kill switch. It is setup as an Emergency Power Off and its function is absolutely dependent on having a GFCI mains breaker in your mains panel. There are 2 resistors in series with the switch that limit the current draw to 0.06 amps from line 2 to equipment ground. This leakage current will trip the GFCI instantly. BTW, I would not use a key switch. It should be a mementary contact - push button switch. So if I use a 50amp breaker in the main and add the two resistors in series with the Line2, there should be a problem? Also, the reason for the key switch is that the system will be set in my step-dads garage (since I live in an apartment while Im in college) and the place often has kids running around...just thought it was an extra precaution...

One other thing - You show a 3 position switch that controls the contactors for the heating elements. Based on the switch, you will be running only one element or the other at any given time. If this is the case, there is no need for 2 - 240V circuit breakers. One is more than adaquate. I would much prefer having the posibility of using both elements at the same time, just thought that this would cause an overload. So if I were to use to selector switches as in Tibers diagram, I shouldnt have any problems?

As far as the SSR outputs feeding the contactors - this is done to remove all voltage from the kettles when power is not required. It is another huge safety requirement. good to know! Thanks!

If I can be of any help to you, please let me know. When you get your layout close to what you want, I'd be glad to draw a final diagram for you.
This is EXTREMELY generous of you...really appreciated!
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Old 10-24-2010, 06:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EFaden View Post
#1 seems like it wouldn't work as it is wired. I think it would just blow the fuse (as it shorts hot to ground). I think what you would want is a DPST key switch and connect the red and blue through each of the poles.
that does sound much better that what I have suggested!
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Old 10-24-2010, 06:43 PM   #10
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Ok. If you use a 50 amp mains GFCI breaker you can run both elements at the same time. You would be close using 2 - 5500W elements but would have a reasonable margin using a 4500W and a 5500W element. This would be more than adaquate. As far as a kids lockout - I'd use one more contactor to kill the mains power in your brew controller. Use the key switch to lockout the contactor and prevent the controller from powering up..

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