The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > Need advice, panel not GFCI protected

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-31-2012, 03:15 PM   #11
yjfun
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Arlington, Washington
Posts: 225
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Each gfi will protect only its own circuit. The downfall to this type of setup is you have multiple hot wires coming into the panel and no way to shut them all off with one switch unless you add another contactor.

__________________
yjfun is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2012, 03:39 PM   #12
yjfun
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Arlington, Washington
Posts: 225
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

You are correct. There is a chance that something could happen because the circuits aren't completely gfi protected. This is why most people run one larger gfi circuit to their control panel. Do you currently have multiple circuits that you are plugging into or are you going to install what you need?

__________________
yjfun is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2012, 03:47 PM   #13
Dgonza9
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Evanston, Illinois
Posts: 1,183
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yjfun View Post
You are correct. There is a chance that something could happen because the circuits aren't completely gfi protected. This is why most people run one larger gfi circuit to their control panel. Do you currently have multiple circuits that you are plugging into or are you going to install what you need?
I have four 20 amp circuits already. My panel is full so these are slimline breakers to boot. Plus, I already have 2 elements installed in each of my keggles. So if I changed up and went the 240v GFCI breaker route I'd have to plug the holes in the keggle and install new elements.

Much as I want to install gfci's in the panel, I think maybe the inline GFCI's are the way to go I can install them in a box, then feed the panel and be pretty well protected. $25 each, but seems the best way to be safe and keep costs down.

__________________
On Tap: Belgian Barrel Aged Barleywine, Da Yooper's Oatmeal Stout, Breakfast Stout, Hop Your Face Off IIPA, Catcher in the Rye Saison, "Wino-head" Nelsin Sauvin Gumballhead.

Bourbon Barrel Duchesse De Bourgnone
Kegged:

Fermenting English Mild

on Deck: Lager?
Dgonza9 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2012, 03:50 PM   #14
pvtschultz
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: West Allis (Milwaukee), WI, Wisconsin
Posts: 443
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

I still don't understand why a simple 20 amp GFI receptacle won't work for each of the four circuits. I'm assuming that you are plugging everything into the wall already so it is just a matter of changing out the standard outlet for a GFI one. It's a heck of a lot cheaper and just as safe.

__________________
Brewing: BM's Centennial Blonde
Drinking: Brown Ale, Cherry Smoked Robust Porter (way too much smoke!)
On Deck: Dunkel, CAP, Berliner Weiss, Bock, Sour Raspberry Brown, APA...
2014 Gallons Brewed: 19
Gallons Brewed '11-'13: 250


http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/pvt...inally-298407/
pvtschultz is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2012, 04:02 PM   #15
yjfun
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Arlington, Washington
Posts: 225
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Since you already have the circuits run pvtschultz is right the cheapest way is to just replace your existing outlets with gfi outlets. The only downside is if one circuit has a problem the others all stay on.

It does cost more money but you could take out your 4 peanut breakers and install one 2 pole gfi breaker in the 30-50 amp range and run a 4 wire cord over to your control panel. By doing this you could use the two legs as separate 120 volt circuits and not have to change your existing keggle elements.

__________________
yjfun is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2012, 04:14 PM   #16
Dgonza9
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Evanston, Illinois
Posts: 1,183
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yjfun View Post
Since you already have the circuits run pvtschultz is right the cheapest way is to just replace your existing outlets with gfi outlets. The only downside is if one circuit has a problem the others all stay on.

It does cost more money but you could take out your 4 peanut breakers and install one 2 pole gfi breaker in the 30-50 amp range and run a 4 wire cord over to your control panel. By doing this you could use the two legs as separate 120 volt circuits and not have to change your existing keggle elements.
This sounds like the way to go. I didn't know you could use each 120v leg separately.

So then I'd need #6 gauge wire to the panel.

I also need someone to point me to a primer on fuses. The rest of my equipment can't be on a circuit with a 60 amp limit.
__________________
On Tap: Belgian Barrel Aged Barleywine, Da Yooper's Oatmeal Stout, Breakfast Stout, Hop Your Face Off IIPA, Catcher in the Rye Saison, "Wino-head" Nelsin Sauvin Gumballhead.

Bourbon Barrel Duchesse De Bourgnone
Kegged:

Fermenting English Mild

on Deck: Lager?
Dgonza9 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2012, 04:16 PM   #17
yjfun
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Arlington, Washington
Posts: 225
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Just size your fuses to the wire sizes they'll be protecting.

__________________
yjfun is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2012, 04:17 PM   #18
Dgonza9
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Evanston, Illinois
Posts: 1,183
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yjfun View Post
Since you already have the circuits run pvtschultz is right the cheapest way is to just replace your existing outlets with gfi outlets. The only downside is if one circuit has a problem the others all stay on.

It does cost more money but you could take out your 4 peanut breakers and install one 2 pole gfi breaker in the 30-50 amp range and run a 4 wire cord over to your control panel. By doing this you could use the two legs as separate 120 volt circuits and not have to change your existing keggle elements.
I'm sorry, but I don't understand you. My elements already plug into gfci receptacles. My concern is that I want to switch these receptacles from my panel. The panel is therefore not GFCI protected. The GFCI is only protecting what is downstream of it. The entire panel is upstream of the GFCI outlets.
__________________
On Tap: Belgian Barrel Aged Barleywine, Da Yooper's Oatmeal Stout, Breakfast Stout, Hop Your Face Off IIPA, Catcher in the Rye Saison, "Wino-head" Nelsin Sauvin Gumballhead.

Bourbon Barrel Duchesse De Bourgnone
Kegged:

Fermenting English Mild

on Deck: Lager?
Dgonza9 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2012, 04:22 PM   #19
Dgonza9
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Evanston, Illinois
Posts: 1,183
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yjfun View Post
Just size your fuses to the wire sizes they'll be protecting.
So a fuse like THIS.

Fuse holder?
__________________
On Tap: Belgian Barrel Aged Barleywine, Da Yooper's Oatmeal Stout, Breakfast Stout, Hop Your Face Off IIPA, Catcher in the Rye Saison, "Wino-head" Nelsin Sauvin Gumballhead.

Bourbon Barrel Duchesse De Bourgnone
Kegged:

Fermenting English Mild

on Deck: Lager?
Dgonza9 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-31-2012, 04:36 PM   #20
yjfun
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Arlington, Washington
Posts: 225
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I don't see a voltage rating on that one. This is what I would use

http://www.discountfuse.com/KTK_10_B...se_p/ktk10.htm

This is what we use at work for anything 120-480 volt. They are relatively cheap and very easy to find in a lot of different ampacities. There are also standardized fuse block assemblies for them at the bottom of the link page.

__________________
yjfun is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
GFCI trips continuously--advice neede djdixon1995 Electric Brewing 12 01-28-2012 03:33 AM
will this GFCI panel work? NoCornOrRice Electric Brewing 4 01-12-2012 05:15 PM
GFCI 30 amp cords extinct? Question on GFCI breaker too... jdlev Electric Brewing 23 07-26-2011 01:01 AM
Panel GFCI Breaker IrregularPulse Electric Brewing 13 03-23-2011 08:43 PM