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-   -   Need advice, panel not GFCI protected (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/need-advice-panel-not-gfci-protected-299756/)

Dgonza9 01-31-2012 01:21 AM

Need advice, panel not GFCI protected
 
I'm planning a control panel to control 4 2000w elements in two keggles, a RIMS tube and two pumps. DPST contactors and illuminated, pushbutton switches.

Question is, do I need gfci protection for the panel? Right now, my keggles plug into GFCI outlets. I was planning on running lines from the breakers to the control panel, then running lines to GFCI outlets to plug the keggles in. But I'm worried that my panel isn't GFCI protected.

I don't know much about fuses, so for now, my plan was to wire the contactors to share 2 separate 20 amp lines. The BK and HLT won't be on at the same time, then have a third 20amp line for Rims tube and pumps.

I know this isn't elegant. But I don't know much about fuses. 220V would involve a lot of changes from where I'm currently at.

Other than trying to install 4 20 amp gfci breakers, any suggestions?

Thanks.

Dgonza9 01-31-2012 01:46 AM

Could I just use 3 of THESE

Looks like the 20 amp gfci breakers run about $75-$80 each. So this is at least cheaper.

pvtschultz 01-31-2012 02:58 AM

That's a whole 'lot of extension cords you must be using. Why not just go with these receptacles?

http://www.amazon.com/Leviton-7899-W...7982252&sr=8-1

lschiavo 01-31-2012 03:39 AM

How much current do you expect the panel to draw? I would plug it into one of the existing gfi receptacles. Controls usually don't use much power.

Fuses are simple - just match the wire size to the fuse.

A diagram is a great help. Sketch one up for review or start with one here and we can help make your revisions.

yjfun 01-31-2012 05:14 AM

lschiavo is right the panel won't draw much power even with the amount of stuff you have in there. Just feed all your control power off of one gfi outlet and it'll save you a lot of hassle.

Dgonza9 01-31-2012 12:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yjfun (Post 3725820)
lschiavo is right the panel won't draw much power even with the amount of stuff you have in there. Just feed all your control power off of one gfi outlet and it'll save you a lot of hassle.

So you're saying to run one 60 amp line to the panel with #6 gauge wire. Then use fuses to protect things? I'd need a 60 amp gfci breaker, though, no?

I was thinking of that. It's just that I started in the direction of plugging keggles and my RIMS box into switched GFCI outlets. So I have four circuits in the area already. I was just going to feed those circuits to my panel, but then my panel isn't GFCI protected.

I'll make up a few sketches before I proceed.

Dgonza9 01-31-2012 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yjfun (Post 3725820)
lschiavo is right the panel won't draw much power even with the amount of stuff you have in there. Just feed all your control power off of one gfi outlet and it'll save you a lot of hassle.

Okay, I must have missed something. If I have a brew kettle running, that's two 2000w elements at 120V. So they're drawing about 33 amps of power. How can I provide power to the panel from a 20 amp GFCI?

lschiavo 01-31-2012 02:29 PM

I was envisioning three 20A GFI circuits. One for each element and one for control/pumps.

yjfun 01-31-2012 03:03 PM

That's what I was thinking. Run two circuits from your main panel into your control panel through the relays or ssr's to feed two 20 amp gfi outlets on your control panel. Plug in your elements. Run an extension cord from a third 20 amp gfi on your garage wall (or wherever you brew) to your control panel and connect your switches, pids, indicator lights, pump, etc.

Dgonza9 01-31-2012 03:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yjfun (Post 3726757)
That's what I was thinking. Run two circuits from your main panel into your control panel through the relays or ssr's to feed two 20 amp gfi outlets on your control panel. Plug in your elements. Run an extension cord from a third 20 amp gfi on your garage wall (or wherever you brew) to your control panel and connect your switches, pids, indicator lights, pump, etc.

I see what you are saying. The elements will be protected by their GFCI outlets. The switches and pumps by the GFCI line I provide into the panel.

You're saying that there's no need to provide GFCI protection for the relays and terminal bars themselves inside the panel, though. Correct?

My concern is that the panel could get splashed or something and it's not really GFCI protected. The gfci protection is upstream for my 2 20 amp circuits and so power will not be shut off at the panel if it becomes energized. Or am I wrong about that?


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