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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > Keg to ekeggle conversion pics
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Old 10-11-2011, 07:49 PM   #71
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Once it got to a boil, we turned the PID down to 75%. That was still too much, so we lowered it to 65% if I remember correctly. It probably could have gone a little lower. The ambient temp was about 60-65 degrees.

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Old 10-11-2011, 10:32 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clearwaterbrewer
That design is nice, but in my opinion, it has one flaw, it is too long.

Even though the first inch of most elements is not heated, I would really think that you want the element as close to having it's base at the Kettle wall as possible.

I am looking at using a 2" sanitary ferrule on the keggle, then a recessed cup that the element goes in, and instead of screwing the element in, using a locknut (will not have clearance to be able to get socket in to tighten element) the recessed cup will be welded to another ferrule, and clamped..

-mike
The only limitation is the size of the ferrule you weld to the kettle. If you use anything 1.5" or less, it should be fine.
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Old 10-12-2011, 12:59 AM   #73
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Originally Posted by kevink View Post


Any chance of getting a sketch out of a diagram of this? I love this and I can follow some of what's going on just from how neat you did this, but can't quite follow all of it. I've been slogging through the forums trying to find a wiring diagram to use on my single vessel eBIAB that I'm doing and this is the best one I've seen. I'm going pretty basic but also want the option (but not the strict need) to plug a pump in, which you appear to have.

This is so beautiful it brings a tear to my eye. How can I copy it?
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Old 10-12-2011, 02:09 AM   #74
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Originally Posted by govain View Post
Any chance of getting a sketch out of a diagram of this? I love this and I can follow some of what's going on just from how neat you did this, but can't quite follow all of it. I've been slogging through the forums trying to find a wiring diagram to use on my single vessel eBIAB that I'm doing and this is the best one I've seen. I'm going pretty basic but also want the option (but not the strict need) to plug a pump in, which you appear to have.

This is so beautiful it brings a tear to my eye. How can I copy it?
Look here for a recirculating e-BIAB system. This is what I was going to do before I stumbled across my Brew Magic system. It has a parts list and wiring diagram.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/my-...thread-269164/
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Old 10-13-2011, 05:05 AM   #75
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This is so beautiful it brings a tear to my eye. How can I copy it?
Thanks for the awesome compliment!

I don't have a diagram, but it's so simple that it doesn't even need one. You can see where the hots and neutral come in. One hot (black) goes to the relay and then to the element outlet. The three other hots (black) go to the fuse block and then to the switches for the PID, relay coil, and pump outlet. The three neutrals go to the PID, relay coil, and the pump outlet. The red hot goes to the SSR, then to the relay, then to the element outlet. The ground comes in and goes directly to a lug attached to the chassis. Grounds from the pump outlet and element outlet also go to the lug. The other ground that you see on the left side of the photo goes from the main ground lug to the top plate that the switches and PID are mounted to.

After that, you have the SSR control wires that go between the PID and SSR and the RTD wires that go from the RTD to the PID. That's it! Let me know if you have any specific questions and I'll try to help.
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Old 10-13-2011, 05:11 AM   #76
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I just checked out the link to the wiring diagram that jtkratzer posted. That should have everything you need. It's a little different due to the illuminated switches, the e-stop, and how he didn't put a fuse before the relay coil, but other than that it's pretty much exactly what I did.

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Old 10-16-2011, 04:25 AM   #77
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I made a little more progress after finally getting my lathe back together last night. I bored and threaded a hole in an end cap for a liquid tight cord grip for the element power cord. All that's left is to weld a tab on the inside of the end cap for the ground wire and weld this ferrule to another one so it can be clamped to the end cap that's welded to the keggle. It should provide a nice water tight enclosure for the element connections.

I should be able to hose this thing down and not get a drop of water in there. I'm actually now worried about getting water in the Auber RTD. It seems kind of cheaply made. I think they mean liquid tight from the inside. Well, duh. There's no way that the pins that stick out of the RTD are liquid tight. There's also the seam where the two parts of it are screwed together. It doesn't look like there's any gasket or sealer between the two parts, but I'll have to take it apart to check.



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Old 10-18-2011, 03:21 AM   #78
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looks really good man, nice work thus far.

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Old 10-18-2011, 06:01 AM   #79
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I should be able to hose this thing down and not get a drop of water in there. I'm actually now worried about getting water in the Auber RTD. It seems kind of cheaply made. I think they mean liquid tight from the inside. Well, duh. There's no way that the pins that stick out of the RTD are liquid tight. There's also the seam where the two parts of it are screwed together. It doesn't look like there's any gasket or sealer between the two parts, but I'll have to take it apart to check.
Yep, those Auber RTD's are not water tight. I don't think they are even water resistant.
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Old 10-20-2011, 11:11 PM   #80
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I finally made a ground lug for the keg and welded it to the tri clamp end cap of the element enclosure. I also welded the ferrules of the enclosure together, so I guess it's done! I spent a lot of time thinking about how to make the "ultimate" element enclosure that is completely water tight (or idiot proof). I believe this is it. The only thing that would make it any cooler would be to have the element tri-clamp removable. A really easy modification could be done to this setup to allow it, but I have yet to see a need. Maybe after a few batches...

Ground lug:




Either clamp can be removed to gain access to the element connections:









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