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Old 11-27-2012, 03:11 PM   #21
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The only problem I have with that drawing. I would put the on/off switch for the heating element on the low voltage side of the SSR or control it with a contactor. I'm sure you don't want to be grabbing the 240v switch with the possibility of wet hands.



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Old 11-27-2012, 08:55 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by ColeBeer78 View Post
The only problem I have with that drawing. I would put the on/off switch for the heating element on the low voltage side of the SSR or control it with a contactor. I'm sure you don't want to be grabbing the 240v switch with the possibility of wet hands.
Actually, you want the switch on the high voltage side because SSRs often fail closed. The PID is your low voltage side switch.


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Old 01-24-2013, 09:27 PM   #23
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I'm confused as to why/how the SSR interupts one of the hot leads, and then that de-powers the heating element? Won't the other power lead from the 220v source then be able to still power the element?

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Old 01-24-2013, 09:35 PM   #24
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Think of it like a water shut off valve. The electrons flow thru the heating element but only when the valve is on. If the valve is off the electrons can not flow thru the heating element. If the element has two hot leads going to it I would assume it is designed for 220 or 460 volts. Turning off one leg prevents the flow of electrons from phase A to phase B. same thing if it is only 115 volt from phase A to neutral/ground.

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Old 01-24-2013, 09:47 PM   #25
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So it works because the system is A/C, and the other positive is required as a ground once every other cycle? Why can't the ground/neutral act as the ground when one of the hot leads is disconnected?

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Old 01-25-2013, 01:44 PM   #26
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So it works because the system is A/C, and the other positive is required as a ground once every other cycle? Why can't the ground/neutral act as the ground when one of the hot leads is disconnected?
There is no neutral going to the heating element, it is H-H-G. If everything is operating normally, there is no current going to ground, as it is there for safety if something goes awry. So the 240V circuit is only closed (on) if both hots are powered. When the PID-controlled hot is not powered, there is no voltage going to the element (leakage aside). However, if you were to measure across the other element and ground you would get 120V.
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:19 PM   #27
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I took some liberties with your diagram P/J in irfanview. Keep in mind that I am know very little about electrical, but I feel I know enough to merely delete stuff!

Would this be an acceptable set-up for a PID controlled BIAB setup?

Thank you for the help guys, I've spent some time reading about AC current trying to learn as much as I can.

So in the above schematic with a neutral and one hot 220v lead going to the PID, is the PID then powered by 110V (even though it does not have a second hot lead)? Could the PID alternatively be powered by two hot leads to 9 and 10?
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:53 PM   #28
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Thank you for the help guys, I've spent some time reading about AC current trying to learn as much as I can.

So in the above schematic with a neutral and one hot 220v lead going to the PID, is the PID then powered by 110V (even though it does not have a second hot lead)? Could the PID alternatively be powered by two hot leads to 9 and 10?
I believe so for the Auber 2352, which is quite useful if you only have 240V in the control panel. But if you also have 120V, I don't know of any good reason to use higher voltage to power the PID.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:43 PM   #29
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I believe so for the Auber 2352, which is quite useful if you only have 240V in the control panel. But if you also have 120V, I don't know of any good reason to use higher voltage to power the PID.
Yeah, I have a 3 wire 220v dryer outlet. And my understanding is that you need a 4 wire to split the 220v to 110v.

I also don't have a GFCI breaker on my dryer circuit. Does anyone know if GFCI can work with a three wire system installed in the project box?
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Old 01-26-2013, 07:45 PM   #30
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There are some systems that have what's called a wild leg and it will measure 220v to ground. These set ups are rare and usually in commercial buildings. The heating element in this post is a 220v so you most likely will not hook up the neutral but to 2 phases. Both phases will be supplying 110v to either side of the heating element. You can turn the heating element off by installing the switch and breaking one leg. You will still have a measurement of 110 volts at the element but because the circuit is open it will not be heating.



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