Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > How fast will it boil?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-29-2011, 04:20 AM   #1
GregKelley
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North Royalton, OH
Posts: 134
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default How fast will it boil?

I'm an extract with special grains brewer. Have my own grain mill and buy my extract in bulk. I typically do 5 gallon batches with a propane burner.

I'm very curious about doing it electric for all the reasons repeated on this forum. My question is how fast will it boil 5 gallons? I would assume that the gravity of the wort may have an affect on the time. I usually perform a late extract addition to maximize hop usage. Also, how rigorous of a boil will these electric systems create?

I'm thinking of starting with just a boil kettle handled by a PID in manual mode. If all works well, I might switch to all grain again powering it by electric elements.

__________________
GregKelley is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-29-2011, 05:42 AM   #2
zacc
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: california
Posts: 63
Liked 6 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I'm using an electric system with converted 15 gallon kegs and normally do 10 gallon batches. I'm using 5500w electric elements like the ones Kal uses on theelectricbrewery.com.

I havent timed it but i would say boil time on my system is faster than when i used propane. Usually on brew day I get up, fill the kettle and set the PID to my strike water temp. Then I'l go make breakfast, coffee, look over my recipe etc. By the time i get back to check on the water its usually right at strike temp or close to it.

You won't have any trouble maintaining whatever kind of boil you like with the right size element. During the boil i put mine in manual mode at about 75%, this gives it a nice rolling boil.

My electric system is still fairly new, I've only done about 7 batches on it. I would highly recommend electric and wish i would have done it sooner. The only real issue with an electric system is ensuring it's built safetly. A lot of people are scared of electricity but really anthing can be dangerous if the right precautions aren't taken. Just make sure your confident in what your doing and if you have any doubts have an electrician look over it.

__________________
zacc is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-29-2011, 12:27 PM   #3
rico567
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rico567's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Central IL
Posts: 3,018
Liked 83 Times on 78 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Brewmation has a chart on their site that shows boil times, with the different size elements on one side and the number of gallons on the other. But no matter which element is used, 5 gallons is around 14-17 minutes with a temperature rise of about 100F.

__________________

“Malt does more than Milton can / To justify God’s ways to man”

-A. E. Housman (1859–1936). A Shropshire Lad , 1896.

rico567 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-29-2011, 01:29 PM   #4
hatfieldenator
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 494
Liked 17 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I would guess that for a 5 gallon batch, assuming about 6.5 gallons boil volume that it usually takes my system about 20-30 mins to reach full boil. That's starting at a temp of around 160-170 after sparging. I have a single 5500watt heating element. If you're starting from tap water temps it would probably take 45 minutes or so? I've never timed it though so its hard to say for sure.

It seems quicker than when I used to use propane though.

__________________
hatfieldenator is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-29-2011, 01:33 PM   #5
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 62,926
Liked 4959 Times on 3590 Posts
Likes Given: 1004

Default

It depends on the size of your element of course, but I have a 4500 w in my BK in I reach a boil pretty quickly but never timed it. I go from tap water (45-50 degrees) to 180 degrees with a 5500 w element in the HLT in about 20-30 minutes. But that's way more than 6 gallons- more like 10-15 gallons.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Find me on facebook: Lorena Evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-29-2011, 02:25 PM   #6
audger
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: ., Connecticut
Posts: 1,497
Liked 40 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rico567 View Post
But no matter which element is used, 5 gallons is around 14-17 minutes with a temperature rise of about 100F.
not exactly sure how that makes sense... more power = faster temp rise. its usually pretty linear. a 2000w heater is going to be about half as fast as a 4000w heater. i suppose an ultra high density element might boil the water at its surface which would decrease heat transfer, but there is no way a 2kW element is going to boil water just as fast as a 5.5kW element, all else being equal.

it takes 5900 BTUs to get 5 gallons from 70 degrees to boiling (not accounting for heat lost to evaporation or radiaton thru the pot)(the formula is [5gal x 8.3 x (212* - 70*) ] ).

an electric element puts out around 3400 BTUs/hour, per 1000 watts (so a 4kW element is 13,600 BTUs/Hr).

divide 5900 by the BTUs/Hr your element produces. multiply that number by 60 and you have how many minutes it takes to boil 5 gallons starting at 70 degrees.
__________________
audger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-29-2011, 04:13 PM   #7
cyberbackpacker
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
 
cyberbackpacker's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Holland, Michigan
Posts: 1,501
Liked 16 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

There is a nice excel spreadsheet that actually lets you plug in your numbers to get time to boil, time to temp, find the actual wattage of your true voltage, etc. so you can figure things out. It is called "electric heat". Do a search for it. I found it on here a few years ago and it has been a great tool.

That said, I punched numbers into it real fast and a 5500w element, at 100% power, will raise 7 gallons of 170F wort to a boil in 8 minutes at (a conservative) 95% rate of efficiency.

A 3500w element on the other hand, all else being equal, would take 13 minutes.

__________________

-Kevin
cyberbackpacker

Trinke Das Bier Das Du Gebraut Hast

cyberbackpacker is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-29-2011, 04:58 PM   #8
rico567
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rico567's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Central IL
Posts: 3,018
Liked 83 Times on 78 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by audger View Post
not exactly sure how that makes sense... more power = faster temp rise. its usually pretty linear. a 2000w heater is going to be about half as fast as a 4000w heater. i suppose an ultra high density element might boil the water at its surface which would decrease heat transfer, but there is no way a 2kW element is going to boil water just as fast as a 5.5kW element, all else being equal.

it takes 5900 BTUs to get 5 gallons from 70 degrees to boiling (not accounting for heat lost to evaporation or radiaton thru the pot)(the formula is [5gal x 8.3 x (212* - 70*) ] ).

an electric element puts out around 3400 BTUs/hour, per 1000 watts (so a 4kW element is 13,600 BTUs/Hr).

divide 5900 by the BTUs/Hr your element produces. multiply that number by 60 and you have how many minutes it takes to boil 5 gallons starting at 70 degrees.
What I meant was the time spread wasn't much, no matter which element was selected. If you have issues with the chart, take it up with Brewmation.
__________________

“Malt does more than Milton can / To justify God’s ways to man”

-A. E. Housman (1859–1936). A Shropshire Lad , 1896.

rico567 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
50a hlt/boil controller lschiavo Electric Brewing 26 02-26-2012 09:54 PM
boil or soak in Sanitizer alemonster Electric Brewing 4 08-05-2011 12:55 AM
enough power for a 10 gallon boil? Stellrbrewr Electric Brewing 11 06-12-2011 08:49 PM
Will it boil? 2 Heatsticks honkey Electric Brewing 4 12-02-2010 06:34 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS