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Old 11-07-2011, 03:25 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by samc View Post
That's not my concern at all. All I was saying was that you don't have any need to size wire above the load the switch can handle, therefore the soldering issue is much easier. If a wire can handle 30 amps @ 240v but the switch only handles 10amps and you put 30 amps on it the switch will burn up.
I am looking at the Grainger page and it says 25A at 125V AC, which is what the switch will really be carrying on each set of poles... (the center of the element will be at an imaginary neutral, since the phases are 180 degrees out. yes, if you had one side closed, and the other open, you could see a 240V potential)

Mainly, if the switch is not 'switched' under load, the extra arcing potential of 250VAC can never be present, so the 25A should be fine, as if there is no arcing potential, Amps are amps, be they at 125V or 250V. Yes, the 'rating' is not 100% correct, but if the circuit is protected by a 25A breaker, there should be no issues...
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Old 11-07-2011, 04:15 PM   #22
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A bit more food for thought - crimped connections are often recommended over solder in high current applications. A fault (even momentary) could melt the solder and cause further harm.
That is why soldered connections should be mechanically secure (crimped) before soldering.. Unless there is a lot of tension on the wire, putting some or all strands through and then twisting is better, and will 99.9% be no issue when used with heat shrink, (but as said, not as good as crimping)
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Old 11-07-2011, 04:18 PM   #23
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So the ? is still out, why do you need 10 gauge wire going into a switch that can't handle the load a 10 gauge can handle?
please read the link provided below the drawing...
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Old 11-07-2011, 04:36 PM   #24
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Old 11-07-2011, 04:58 PM   #25
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I am looking at the Grainger page and it says 25A at 125V AC, which is what the switch will really be carrying on each set of poles... (the center of the element will be at an imaginary neutral, since the phases are 180 degrees out. yes, if you had one side closed, and the other open, you could see a 240V potential)

Mainly, if the switch is not 'switched' under load, the extra arcing potential of 250VAC can never be present, so the 25A should be fine, as if there is no arcing potential, Amps are amps, be they at 125V or 250V. Yes, the 'rating' is not 100% correct, but if the circuit is protected by a 25A breaker, there should be no issues...
So, in essence, this switch is safe to use for this purpose due to the on-off-on configuration of the switch? Some of us are not educated "electrically" and need pretty basic help understanding the terminology.

Are there any better alternatives? Also, is placing half the wires through the hole on the switch and soldering back to itself appropriate? I ask these questions so that I don't have to start a bunch of other threads later on when I actually get to build my E-brewery
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Old 11-07-2011, 05:27 PM   #26
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Are there any better alternatives?
Grainger NKK-Toggle Switch 2TPE7 - DPDT Center Off
Contact Rating @ 125V (Amps) 30
Contact Rating @ 250V (Amps) 30


Grainger NKK-Toggle Switch 2TPF3 - 3PDT Center Off
Contact Rating @ 125V (Amps) 30
Contact Rating @ 250V (Amps) 30

Now check out the prices.
Oh and another thing for all the BS previously posted - How can they possibly be rated for 30A at both voltages?
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Old 11-07-2011, 05:47 PM   #27
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Grainger NKK-Toggle Switch 2TPE7 - DPDT Center Off
Contact Rating @ 125V (Amps) 30
Contact Rating @ 250V (Amps) 30


Grainger NKK-Toggle Switch 2TPF3 - 3PDT Center Off
Contact Rating @ 125V (Amps) 30
Contact Rating @ 250V (Amps) 30

Now check out the prices.
Oh and another thing for all the BS previously posted - How can they possibly be rated for 30A at both voltages?
I have no problems with using the switch that the OP had previously posted about (2TNZ7 - and it is on the parts list that you sent me yesterday P-J), so if this is the switch that will do the job, that is the way I will go. I am just trying to figure out the reasoning as to how the switch works/how it is applicable to the control panel. I was just curious if there were any other alternatives (better/worse/etc.).

Just trying to better myself through learning how these things work...
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Old 11-07-2011, 05:58 PM   #28
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The switch in the first post is undersized!

Lets look at it from a wattage standpoint:

125V x 25A = 3125W
250V x 9A = 2250W

This is the max load the switch can safely handle. Either way, its too small to switch a 5500W load.

And we should be using the 250V rating for this application. L1 and L2 are both connected to the switch the arc across the contacts will be caused by 250V.

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Old 11-07-2011, 06:10 PM   #29
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Another option is to wire a low power rated toggle switch to switch the 120VAC coil of this 2-pole contactor (which would be wired to the heating element) for a less expensive option:

Grainger 6GNZ2

That contactor is rated for 30A resistive load, no problem for a 5500W heater. There is a 240VAC and a 24VAC coil version of the contactor coil also.

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Old 11-07-2011, 06:11 PM   #30
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Oh and another thing for all the BS previously posted - How can they possibly be rated for 30A at both voltages?
Because they are tested and certified at that voltage and current. Look around many switches are rated at the same current and multiple voltages. Took me a few seconds to find a few examples.
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