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Old 08-08-2013, 03:28 AM   #1
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Default High Gravity BIAB Electric Brewing System

I'll be moving to a new place and will be able to brew beer in my garage using the High Gravity BIAB Electric Brewing System, both of which I hope to buy sooner than later.

I've been brewing all grain for several years using gas but the move has me seriously considering using a 62 quart kettle with a 4500 watt heating element that requires a 200volt 30amp ground fault outlet.

I was just wondering if any brewers out there might be willing to share with me their electric brewing knowledge, about heating and boiling 10 gallons of 1.060 or lower wort. I already planned on using some form of mechanical lifting device to raise the wet grain before the boil.



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Old 08-08-2013, 10:31 AM   #2
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It takes less than 20 minutes to heat the water up to mash temp, then another 10 or so to bring it to a boil after mashing. I mounted an eye bolt into one of the studs in my garage ceiling. I added a simple ratchet pulley system that locks as you pull the rope. My entire setup is on a rolling cart so I just roll out my system and brew directly underneath the eye bolt. When it's time to remove the grains, I just hook up the ratchet to the bag and pull away. I squeeze the grain bag then just let it sit over the pot until the boil starts. I roll the pot away and lower the grains into a bucket. Then it's just a simple, dump and rinse out the bag.



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Old 08-09-2013, 11:42 AM   #3
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What size, how many cfm, would you recommend to exhaust the boil vapors outside and prevent the garage from becoming a steam room? I know the guidelines used for a sizing bathroom exhaust fan recommend changing the air 8 times an hour.

To calculate the CFM's needed to comply with the ACH guidelines you're supposed to multiply the length times the width times the height of the brewroom, to get the total cubic volume of air in the room.

Next multiply that number by eight, to represent the number of air changes per hour, and then divide that number by 60 to get the number of cubic feet per minute needed. I wonder if this formula works as good for hot wort vapors and hop aromas as it does for bathrooms.

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Old 08-09-2013, 01:41 PM   #4
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Wouldn't a better guideline be to size for a range hood? I think that would be based on BTU rather than air exchange.

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Old 08-09-2013, 01:48 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrewyBrewer View Post
I'll be moving to a new place and will be able to brew beer in my garage using the High Gravity BIAB Electric Brewing System, both of which I hope to buy sooner than later.
Although this isn't an answer to your question . . . I would greatly appreciate it if you would post your experience using the High Gravity system. There was another thread a little while back discussing it.

Thanks,
Keith
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Old 08-10-2013, 02:54 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kzimmer0817 View Post
Although this isn't an answer to your question . . . I would greatly appreciate it if you would post your experience using the High Gravity system. There was another thread a little while back discussing it.

Thanks,
Keith
I'm still in the planning stages, this is the system I'm looking to buy so can't contribute any experiences with it yet.

A range hood is a good idea, it''ll help to funnel the rising hot vapors into a central collection point on the intake side of the fan. But realistically if the fan's cfm isn't sufficient the hot vapors will spill out from under the range hood and steam up the garage, which is what I want to avoid.
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Old 08-10-2013, 03:11 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrewyBrewer
I'm still in the planning stages, this is the system I'm looking to buy so can't contribute any experiences with it yet.

A range hood is a good idea, it''ll help to funnel the rising hot vapors into a central collection point on the intake side of the fan. But realistically if the fan's cfm isn't sufficient the hot vapors will spill out from under the range hood and steam up the garage, which is what I want to avoid.
Sorry, let me be more clear. I don't mean that you have to use a range hood, but rather size the blower as if you were sizing a range hood. For example, my range at home puts out a maximum of 120,000 btus across all burners. That dictates a hood that can draw 900cfm.
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Old 08-11-2013, 01:23 PM   #8
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Sorry, let me be more clear. I don't mean that you have to use a range hood, but rather size the blower as if you were sizing a range hood. For example, my range at home puts out a maximum of 120,000 btus across all burners. That dictates a hood that can draw 900cfm.
Thanks for the feedback, but I wasn't able to find a conversion formula that calculates btus directly to cfms.

The closest I could come up with as follows:

A btu equals the energy needed to raise 1lb. of water 1F
A gallon of water weighs 8.35 lbs.
A watt is equal to 1 volt times 1 amp

With that said 220 volts * 30 amps = 6600 watts and the High Gravity's heating element is rated at 4500 watts, the circuit has a 33% buffer in it.

Heating 70F water to boiling 212F requires raising the temperature another 142F higher.

Where 10 gallons of water weighs 83.5 pounds and is raised 142F the btus needed are 11,857

As you can see according to the formulas I've found, there is still a gap between converting btus to cfms.
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Old 08-11-2013, 03:37 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrewyBrewer
Thanks for the feedback, but I wasn't able to find a conversion formula that calculates btus directly to cfms.

The closest I could come up with as follows:

A btu equals the energy needed to raise 1lb. of water 1F
A gallon of water weighs 8.35 lbs.
A watt is equal to 1 volt times 1 amp

With that said 220 volts * 30 amps = 6600 watts and the High Gravity's heating element is rated at 4500 watts, the circuit has a 33% buffer in it.

Heating 70F water to boiling 212F requires raising the temperature another 142F higher.

Where 10 gallons of water weighs 83.5 pounds and is raised 142F the btus needed are 11,857

As you can see according to the formulas I've found, there is still a gap between converting btus to cfms.
Not original - I copied and pasted from another site:

If the range hood is attached to a wall, you should have 100 cubic feet per minute(cfm) per linear foot. So if you have a 30" wide range, you should have a hood rated at 250 cfm ((30/12)*100 =250). If the hood is over an island, you'll use 150 cfm/linear foot. In this case that same 30" cook top, would require 375 cfm ((30/12)*150 = 375).

Next we'll determine the minimum capacity based on British thermal units(BTU)/hour, by dividing the BTU/hour by 100. For example, if we had a cooktop that produced 40,000 BTUs, we would need 400 cfm. If you are using an electric range (measured in watts), simply multiply watts by 3.41214163 to determine BTU/hr.

The final calculation, will be based on the size of the kitchen. The air in the kitchen should be cycled 15 times per hour, so our formula will be ft³/4. If we have a 10ft x 10ft x 8ft kitchen, (10 X 10 X 8)/4 = 200 cfm.

We'll then choose the largest from these three calculations, and that will be the minimum size hood we need. If you are doing more cooking than the average person, or just want a little more air movement. You can always get a larger hood, this is just the minimum size you should consider.

That should give you a pretty good starting point for sizing.
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:01 PM   #10
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Range hood is more critical IMO for an enclosed room or basement. A two car garage is much larger than a bathroom or kitchen so you might get away without ventilation or just opening the garage door.

Use the 5500W ULWD element, it is still under 30amps.



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