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-   -   GFI is it really needed ? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/gfi-really-needed-296449/)

shutupjojo 01-20-2012 05:10 AM

GFI is it really needed ?
 
I have been brewing for a few years with a 3 wire system running 2 5500 w elements with the ground connected securely to the keggles. No GFI just a few 40 amp breakers , ssr's and 2 pids. I am still alive and my system works great and I am very confident about it. If your brew pots are grounded, are you safe ? Do you really need a GFI breaker ? I am no expert on this but I am familiar with 220 volt 3 wire . I have a hardwood floor business and all my sanders are 3 wire and run safe. I understand that brewing pots are full of liquid but if they are grounded then isn't that enough ? Is a GFI breaker really just a safety seat ?

EarthBound 01-20-2012 05:24 AM

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/gfci-241847/

samc 01-20-2012 06:27 AM

Just get one and install it, don't try to outsmart the technology as it only takes one instance to ruin your day/life, etc. Do you have kids who might run into the area you are brewing and happen to lay a hand on a piece of metal at just the wrong time when something goes crazy? Do you let them ride in the car without seat belts? My early years I rode in cars without seat belts cause we didn't have them, doesn't mean I don't wear them now.

btw - do you come up to Portland for your business? Going to need to do my floors one of these days.

TheDom 01-20-2012 10:16 AM

Like a lot of safety equipment, it is rarely "needed" until it is. I'm sure hard hats are rarely actually needed on construction sites, but they provide cheap reduction of the consequences of a low probability, high consequence event.

nvr2low 01-20-2012 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheDom (Post 3685860)
Like a lot of safety equipment, it is rarely "needed" until it is. I'm sure hard hats are rarely actually needed on construction sites, but they provide cheap reduction of the consequences of a low probability, high consequence event.

i think that sums it up. wont need it till you do, and then you will wish you had it.

Homercidal 01-20-2012 01:14 PM

I'll be testing my new electric equipment right after I install my GFCI Spa Panel.

And NOT before.

djt17 01-20-2012 01:18 PM

My first heatstick I built kept tripping the GFCI during the initial test. Just to see if it was working, I plugged it into a non-gfci circuit. It worked; but I stayed FAR away while it was plugged in. I found the problem, it works fine now plugged into a GFCI. Yes, you need a GFCI!

Dert 01-20-2012 10:21 PM

Of course it is not really needed, this could example of real-time Darwinism.

Quaffer 01-21-2012 08:08 PM

The GFCI protects you if you come in contact with a live wire and touch a grounded object. How necessary this is depends partly on how well you have constructed your electrical system, how often you plug and unplug things, and have spills. As a general rule, when we work with electrical appliances in wet environments we should use a GFCI because the water makes a good grounding path that can easily kill you, should you touch a wire. The chance for a lethal shock is a lot higher in wet environments. Home made electric breweries seems to me to be the obvious place to have a GFCI.

joeybeer 01-21-2012 08:49 PM

I'm really conservative when it comes to spending money, but my a$$ is worth a lot more than 50 bucks.


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