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Old 01-14-2011, 04:37 PM   #1
Steven9026
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Default food grade silicone

Would aquarium sealing silicone be considered food grade or safe to use inside my electric HLT to seal around the heating element?

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Old 01-14-2011, 05:24 PM   #2
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Check the MSDS and see if you want to consume the chemicals in the product. I know there are some "food safe" sealants discussed on the forums, but I'm hesitant to reccomend any. In fact, I see no reason to use silicone sealant on a food contact surface when there are better ways to accomplish the same thing; ie. The weldless system that Kal and many others use.

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Old 01-14-2011, 05:35 PM   #3
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Would probably be ok to use, but as Chefkeith points out - you really should not have to seal with it. You either want a silicone o-ring or silicone gasket if needed.
http://www.bargainfittings.com/index...product_id=105 not element sized but you get the idea.

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Old 01-14-2011, 07:09 PM   #4
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thanks for the info. I need to explain I'm mounting this heating element in the bottom of a igloo cooler, if that makes a difference. I was going to order o-rings to replace the original gasket that came with the heating element, even though others have used it with success. I have a supply of EPDM o-rings where I work. I tried using one of these as a temporary o-ring just for testing, and I could not get it to stop leaking. It just drops a drop about every minute or so.. I know the silicone o-rings are a little softer and maybe they will seal. I've also checked to make sure that the nut I am using on the inside was seating all the way and not bottoming out on the threads.

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Old 01-14-2011, 07:36 PM   #5
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Ok guys. Did another test. I removed the copper washer that I made for the ground and it seems to have stopped leaking now.. I'm now testing it with a full load of water and some time. I placed my washer on the element first then the o-ring just like the diagrams I've seen.. I wonder why mine won't stop leaking with it in place. Is there another way to ground it with using the copper washer on the element?

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Old 01-14-2011, 08:07 PM   #6
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According to the FDA. 100% silicone is safe for food contact though I trust the FDA about as much as a crack whore.

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Old 01-15-2011, 04:05 AM   #7
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Once cured 100% silicone should be food safe. If you want one that has been tested you'll have to look for one that is nsf or fda certified. Dow 732 & 748 look to be listed for FDA & NSF applications.

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Old 01-15-2011, 05:04 PM   #8
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love the crack whore comment , but silicone should be food safe, unless your transferring hot wort or mash water then i would use high temp food grade tubing

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Old 01-15-2011, 05:18 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WPStrassburg View Post
Once cured 100% silicone should be food safe. If you want one that has been tested you'll have to look for one that is nsf or fda certified. Dow 732 & 748 look to be listed for FDA & NSF applications.
The problem is that you're not applying 100% silicone. In order to make silicone liquid, some sort of volatile compound must be added. It's the VOC's that may be dangerous, and different manufacturers use different compounds for each line of products. Much of the compound is released into the air causing the silicone to "dry." But I have a hard time believing that you're left with 100% silicone after that, which is why I wouldn't use silicone sealant on any food contact surfaces.

There are, however, silicones approved by the NSF for "food zone areas," but I don't know of any kitchen where silicone sealant is used in direct contact with food.

I'm not saying that you can't find a safe sealant, I'm just saying that I would avoid using it to seal things that come in direct contact with the wort when there are better ways to achieve the same result.
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Old 01-18-2011, 01:37 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefkeith View Post
The problem is that you're not applying 100% silicone. In order to make silicone liquid, some sort of volatile compound must be added. It's the VOC's that may be dangerous, and different manufacturers use different compounds for each line of products. Much of the compound is released into the air causing the silicone to "dry." But I have a hard time believing that you're left with 100% silicone after that, which is why I wouldn't use silicone sealant on any food contact surfaces.

There are, however, silicones approved by the NSF for "food zone areas," but I don't know of any kitchen where silicone sealant is used in direct contact with food.

I'm not saying that you can't find a safe sealant, I'm just saying that I would avoid using it to seal things that come in direct contact with the wort when there are better ways to achieve the same result.
Dow Corning 732 is 100% silicone. No solvents, no volatile compounds. How is this different than using a silicone o-ring?
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