Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > Electrical Fire! Help!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-10-2013, 05:53 PM   #11
whoaru99
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,588
Liked 124 Times on 101 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

I would re-terminate all those push-on connections. Don't believe the intent is to smash them down after they're pushed onto the mating terminals. The spring tension, for lack of better terms, of the push-ons in their normal, non-smashed state is what's relied on for the contact. Don't care much for push-on terminals in (relatively) high current applications, myself.

__________________

Primary: Edwort's Apfelwein
Secondary: Russian Imperial Stout
Drinking: Chinook IPA
Drinking: Waldo Lake Amber
Drinking: Edwort's Apfelwein

whoaru99 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 06:19 PM   #12
kal
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,031
Liked 188 Times on 128 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default



What is the current/voltage rating on those black connectors you have there?
What kinds of plugs are these?

In a different picture it looks like they're connected to a 50A breaker, but I've never seen a 50A receptacle with only push/crimp on connectors like this, especially ones that are so close together, almost touching.

Normally a NEMA 14-50R receptacle (meant for 50A/240V) is really big, with screw connection points that are well spaced out.

Here's a typical NEMA 14-50R receptacle that you'd use for a kitchen stove outlet:





You push the wire in and screw down tightly.

Kal
kal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 06:36 PM   #13
whoaru99
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,588
Liked 124 Times on 101 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

Read all about the Switchcraft connectors here: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/swi...option-369044/

__________________

Primary: Edwort's Apfelwein
Secondary: Russian Imperial Stout
Drinking: Chinook IPA
Drinking: Waldo Lake Amber
Drinking: Edwort's Apfelwein

whoaru99 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 06:50 PM   #14
Bobby_M
Vendor and Brewer
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
Bobby_M's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Whitehouse Station, NJ
Posts: 21,838
Liked 912 Times on 607 Posts
Likes Given: 26

Default

A 2000 watt element on 120v requires at least 12 gauge wire and should be plugged into 20amp components. 1875 is the max rating on the shock buster, you exceeded it. That plug is for 15amps and therefore the connections are only build to accept 14 gauge wire. I'd start over. Get some decent 12/3 SJ cord.

By the way, the ranco is only rated for 15amps resistive on 120v so that's overloaded too.

__________________
BrewHardware.com
Sightglass, Refractometer, Ball Valve, Weldless bulkhead, Thermometer, Decals, Stainless Steel Fittings, Compression Fittings, Camlock Quick Disconnects, Scale, RIMS tube, Plate Chiller, Chugger Pump, Super Clear Silicone Tubing, and more!

New Stuff?
Bobby_M is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 06:52 PM   #15
kal
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,031
Liked 188 Times on 128 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by whoaru99 View Post
Read all about the Switchcraft connectors here: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/swi...option-369044/
Ah! Ok. So they're the (somewhat controversal for AC mains use) Switchcraft connectors.

I don't like seeing uncovered spade terminals used with that amount of heavy gauge wiring coming off them. Bend one of the wires somewhere either on purpose because you're moving something in the box (or bang into it or drop it) and you could have a couple of spades touch.

My 2 cents but I'm starting to change the topic...

Kal
__________________
TheElectricBrewery.com: A step by step guide to building your own electric brewery
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
kal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 07:24 PM   #16
Psych
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kelowna, BC
Posts: 760
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

Note to would be e-brewers: do not disregard the following statement which occurs in some form or other in probably every single e-brewing thread here:

"Do not load your components past 80% of their amperage rating!"

Loading to 120% on more than one component is ridiculous, come on.

__________________
Single vessel E-BIAB setup

Donor Fridge Fermentation Chamber
Psych is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 07:31 PM   #17
Kaz
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Amish Country, PA
Posts: 1,054
Liked 21 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kal View Post
Ah! Ok. So they're the (somewhat controversal for AC mains use) Switchcraft connectors.

I don't like seeing uncovered spade terminals used with that amount of heavy gauge wiring coming off them. Bend one of the wires somewhere either on purpose because you're moving something in the box (or bang into it or drop it) and you could have a couple of spades touch.

My 2 cents but I'm starting to change the topic...

Kal
Those are professional loudspeaker connectors, not really intended for continuous current draw applications. They are usually rated for a peak amperage draw but that is not necessarily the rating for continuous draw as speaker amplifiers are generally not putting out a continuous steady signal under normal operation. You can find lots of specs on them on their originators website Neutrik

http://www.neutrik.com/en/speakon/

I probably have a thousand of those in different flavors in my shop, they are great for speakers, I wouldn't use them so much for high current home appliances. Neutrik does make a line of similar power connectors called PowerCon but not in a 4 pole 50A 208VAC flavor.
__________________

Draft 1: Lightly smoked Weizen
Draft 2: Belgian Wit
Draft 3: Rauchbier

Primary 1: German Scwarzbier
Primary 2:

On Deck: Belgian Brown Ale, Pale Ale, Stout

Kaz is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 08:45 PM   #18
jeffmeh
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jeffmeh's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,805
Liked 131 Times on 112 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaz View Post
Those are professional loudspeaker connectors, not really intended for continuous current draw applications. They are usually rated for a peak amperage draw but that is not necessarily the rating for continuous draw as speaker amplifiers are generally not putting out a continuous steady signal under normal operation. You can find lots of specs on them on their originators website Neutrik

http://www.neutrik.com/en/speakon/

I probably have a thousand of those in different flavors in my shop, they are great for speakers, I wouldn't use them so much for high current home appliances. Neutrik does make a line of similar power connectors called PowerCon but not in a 4 pole 50A 208VAC flavor.
There is much discussion around this in the other thread referenced. The Switchcrafts do have different ratings than the Neutriks. From what I gather, they will handle the load, but connecting or disconnecting while powered on is highly discouraged. I am intrigued by them, but will probably go with something less "controversial" when I finally get the time and the funds to build.
__________________
jeffmeh is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 10:51 PM   #19
mr_tripp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lake St. Louis
Posts: 92
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Thanks everyone. I'm making some adjustments and will report back but I have a quick question. What is the best way to ground to the pot. I have some stainless steel nuts and bolts but how do I prevent leaks?

JB weld?
Rubber washer?
Silicone tape?
Other ideas?

__________________
mr_tripp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-10-2013, 11:17 PM   #20
passedpawn
Moderator
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
passedpawn's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: ☼ Clearwater, FL ☼
Posts: 18,305
Liked 3076 Times on 1935 Posts
Likes Given: 2617

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr_tripp View Post
Thanks everyone. I'm making some adjustments and will report back but I have a quick question. What is the best way to ground to the pot. I have some stainless steel nuts and bolts but how do I prevent leaks?

JB weld?
Rubber washer?
Silicone tape?
Other ideas?
drill a hole near the top and bolt it in there with a nut and lock washer and ring terminal, or put the hole in the handle if it is solid to the pot.
__________________
I'd love to change the world
But I dont know what to do
So Ill leave it up to you
passedpawn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Electrical Help Hoppylikerabbits DIY Projects 2 05-15-2012 11:34 AM
Need electrical advice from electrical engineers Photopilot Equipment/Sanitation 1 01-23-2011 10:58 AM
Direct fire RIMS vs direct fire, auto-stir mash? Hex Equipment/Sanitation 16 12-21-2010 01:34 PM
Best way to run electrical Douglefish DIY Projects 24 06-15-2010 10:11 PM