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Old 08-22-2011, 11:39 PM   #11
Psych
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Default Parts list

This is an attempt at a parts list, and should only be used as a rough guide, not a shopping list by any means. This is what I wound up using, not what I bought and never used. Prices are in Canadian:

Power Box/Control Panel:

- 30amp 4-prong extension wire with inline GFCI (same as on Kal's site), bought on Ebay - $70
- Plastic toolbox from Canadian Tire, the main housing for the switches/pid/ssr/contactor and wiring - approx $6
- Tension relief wire clamp thing, 3/4 inch, bought pack of 4 for $4. This holds the gfci cable nicely into side of toolbox
- 5amp 120v SPST switch - this cuts power to hot leg between mains cable and my PID, lets me turn it on and off - $3
- Auber SYL-2362 PID - $40 (shipping of this item was $30 alone as I had a bad one initially sent to me, Auber did not cover shipping the new one or the return shipping)
- Auber 40amp SSR and 40amp heatsink - $40
- Auber CN-PBC402-240V 40amp 240v Contactor - $20 (shipping for initial order was also $30, so $60 in shipping alone...frack...)
- 2amp 120v indicator light, used to show element is on - $3
- 10 amp 240v DPST(?) toggle switch used to turn Contactor on and off, thereby turning element power on and off - $8
- 4 prong dryer outlet with steel plate for easy mounting (this is where I plug the element cord into on the toolbox, so I can easily seperate the kettle from toolbox for cleaning) - $5
- 4 feet of 3+1 10 gauge cable, used for misc primary load wiring inside toolbox - $5
- 4 feet of 2 wire, 20 gauge wire to run small load stuff inside toolbox - $3

Kettle:

- 4 prong 30 amp dryer extension cord (bare wires at one end connect to element, other end is a 4 prong connector that plugs the kettle into the toolbox dryer plug) - $10
- Stress relief 1/2 inch wire strain clamp thingy for above cable onto element housing - $5
- Single gang all metal electrical box with weatherproof front cover (this is mounted to back of kettle and element wiring is inside of it, with dryer cord feeding in from the side) - $8
- Element itself (4500watt 240v low density Home Hardware (not)special) - $25
- 1 inch NPS locknut and silicon oring, and 1/4 inch NPT locknut and orings, AND stainless steel ball valve with copper dip tube and oring - Brewhardware.com (BobbyM), $50 shipped
- Auber 2 inch liquid tight RTD - $30

Tools and misc:

- Exacto Knife (had this already but was invaluable in carving out the holes on the toolbox to mount stuff into) - $3
- 1 inch spade bit for starting holes in toolbox - $2
- 3/8 inch spade bit for smaller holes in toolbox - $2
- Stove screw and nut pack for mounting dryer plug, contactor and SSR onto toolbox walls - $4
- Lots of ring and spade wiring clamps because I suck at crimping - $10
- Wire stripper/crimper/cutter 3in1 tool - $9 (could have done without just using exacto knife and pliers)
- Analog multimeter - $29 (worth my peace of mind knowing I had everything grounded properly)
- Red marrets (wire cap/plug thingies), easy to use, cheaper than the terminal blocks, and safer imho - $4
- 7/8th inch bi-metal hole saw - $12
- Hole saw mandrel - $15
- whatever the hole saw size is for the 1/2 inch ball valve hole, can't remember now - $12
- Half inch drill bit and a starter bit to do the RTD hole, borrowed my dads but would cost maybe $3
- Borrowed dads drill press, but was definitely a HUGE help for this using hole saws, would have been messy without...

So to break it down as simply as possible:

Gray 30amp gfci cable is plugged into dryer outlet in my wall, this runs into side of toolbox and splits off (ignore my lousy wiring colors, I ran out of black and white halfway through so it's ad-lib...). I split the one hot line from there into three, one goes to the PID switch, which then goes to the PID. Another goes to the Contactor switch (the toggle switch) which then goes into it's own split, one to the indicator light and one to the contactor trigger pole. The final large gauge wire goes to the contactor itself.

The other hot line is split once. One goes straight to the other main pole of the contactor, the other to the other side of the contactor toggle switch which then goes down to the other trigger pole on the contactor.

The neutral is split twice, one goes directly to the PID (I run it off of 120v), the other goes to the only other 120v item in the kit, which is the indicator light.

The ground goes directly to the dryer plug output (so that my kettle can be grounded easily), there is no split here as nothing else in the mix requires grounding (PID, Contactor, SSR and switches are all shielded or so they say).

From the 2 output poles on the Contactor, come two 10 gauge hot lines that go to their corresponding terminals on the dryer plug, and therefore to the kettle.

Note that while I do have four pins on the dryer plug, and a four wire cable leading to the kettle, I do not attach the neutral wire to that at all, there's no need since the element doesn't require it.

Then it's just the simple stuff of the wire ends of the dryer extension cord that go to the kettle getting screwed onto the element screws and the ground wire going to the ground screw on the single gang box. This mates to the side of the kettle, and since there's always contact there by virtue of the locknut holding the element onto the kettle, and the ass end of the element sticking into the single-gang box, the kettle is always grounded.

Hope that helps...there's some spots I'd like to shore up, but so far I've done five brews and not a single issue. No leaks, no shorts, no smoke, the SSR heatsink is fine, everything is sweet.

If you have any specific questions, feel free to hit me up and I can maybe offer some comment from my own experience. This is the most complicated electrical thing I've ever done though so I'm definitely no expert!

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Old 08-23-2011, 07:12 PM   #12
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Thanks for this write-up. Outstanding!

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Old 08-23-2011, 08:39 PM   #13
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I should throw the kettle price on there as well, I suppose, so 40qt aluminum stock kettle from Rona, $59. So roughly $560 before whatever applicable taxes, round up to 600 or so I suppose.

Definitely shy of the $2000 that some people swear is the minimum for an electric setup. If you lived in the states you could do this for under $500 easily as shipping costs were such a huge component.

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Old 08-24-2011, 04:40 PM   #14
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This might be a silly question, but how do you chill? Or do you just no-chill?

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Old 08-24-2011, 07:44 PM   #15
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I use a 25 foot 3/8 immersion chiller that I built...it's uuuugly, my bends were pretty bad. But it works well. For a 5g batch it takes maybe 10 minutes to go from 210F to 70F, and a 7-8G takes 15-20 minutes, maybe 25. Most of the time is at the 100F and below range.

Definitely room for improvement though, fitting a second tighter wound coil in the middle of the existing would be a good start.

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Old 08-24-2011, 09:17 PM   #16
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Nice work Psych, congrats

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Old 08-25-2011, 11:43 AM   #17
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How do you keep the bag from burning on the element?

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Old 08-25-2011, 02:20 PM   #18
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The bag isn't in for long when the element is on, but being a low density element and the bag being....resistant? I don't know what it's made of, it's a sheer curtain, but it's never had any scorching.

I've actually touched my element when it's on full blast (at the start of the day, not during the boil or anything!) and it was warm but not crazy hot, I wrapped a piece of the bag material around it and left it for a bit, no effect.

If your element is low or ultra low density, I think it's fine for most bag types. Some, like cotton, they may suffer a bit maybe?

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Old 08-26-2011, 11:26 PM   #19
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I've had the natural fiber hop socks stick to the element, but never the synthetic weave sacks.

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Old 09-04-2012, 03:41 AM   #20
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Thanks for the write up! Been looking to electrify my HLT, this could be the winter project!

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