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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > Electirc brewing on 110 is it possible
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Old 07-21-2012, 07:51 AM   #1
dpalme
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Default Electirc brewing on 110 is it possible

See everyone brewing using 220 or 240 for electric brewing but I'm wondering if anyone has a 110 setup?

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Old 07-21-2012, 09:52 AM   #2
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I do. I use a pair of ultra-low density 1500 watt elements plugged into separate 20 Amp GFI circuits. I will also throw in a 1000 watt bucket heater (on 3rd circuit) when I am feeling impatient. Once up to temp I can maintain the boil with 1 element. It’s faster than when I would only use my gas stove although it still takes a while. I do 5 gallon full boils batches.

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Old 07-21-2012, 01:39 PM   #3
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I too got by with 120 volts for a while when living in a place with no 240 access. Some tips.

-Use the maximum wattage element you can without blowing the breaker
-Use a second or third outlet in your house to be able to run all elements at once, i.e. find which outlets are on different breakers, I did this with two long extension cords of the correct rating
-Consider using a HERMS system in which the pump cycles on and off to pull heat out of the HLT for the Mash tun. This allows you to heat the HLT to say, 175 F, then just recirculate mash when you need heat. Not ideal, but allows the HLT heating process to take place slowly on brew day, then the 10-15 gallons of hot water act as a battery when the mash needs heat, and the small little 120 V element can keep up with this leveled demand. You will have problems with step mashes, but a single temp mash works perfect.

It is very easy to switch to 240 later, do not let the 120V limit get you down, here is a look at my system, I recently switched from 120 to 240 V. The entire change over was about 15 minutes as i had to re wire one plug, and one controller power source. I also changed an element, but that was not necessary, just done to deliver more wattage to the HLT now that I had 240.

Cheers

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Old 07-21-2012, 02:08 PM   #4
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I have been brewing w/ 110 for years, and just recently have done several 15 gal batches (18-19 gal boil) in a 20 gal pot w/ two 2000w elements. So, yea it's more than possible, it's actually cheap and easy. IME the lower wattage elements can be run simply at 100% w/out control...why throttle back a small element?

Heating times will be slightly longer w/ 110 than using a more powerful 220 / 5500w element, but very tolerable and perhaps quicker than propane or NG.

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Old 07-21-2012, 02:16 PM   #5
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Here is a diagram that might help you:

As always - Click on the image to see a full scale diagram that is printable on Tabloid paper (11" x 17")



P-J

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Old 07-21-2012, 04:53 PM   #6
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P-J...This drawing is most timely as it is almost exactly the way I am reconfiguring my current panel! Thank you so much for creating and posting your wonderful schematics as they are all easy to understand and amazingly helpful! 2 questions for ya:

1) what kind of switches are shown between the SSR's and load...?
2) what would you think of using a pair of these http://www.auberins.com/index.php?ma...roducts_id=250
as control protection for the switch?

Thanks again for all your work and help!

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Old 07-21-2012, 06:06 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpalme View Post
See everyone brewing using 220 or 240 for electric brewing but I'm wondering if anyone has a 110 setup?
Absolutely. And coincidentally I just posted a write up on my brewing rig. I included data on time to temp using two 1500v elements.

Here's the link:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/my-...d-pics-342786/

Here's how long it takes to heat tap water to strike temp:
Minutes Temp
0 80
9 110
13 118
17 129
22 142
29 163


Hope this helps!
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Old 07-21-2012, 09:20 PM   #8
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Dude.... thats SLOW. You should be able to get up to that temp in half the time.. or less... Try using a lid and and or insulate your brew kettle....


Quote:
Originally Posted by seatbelt123 View Post
Absolutely. And coincidentally I just posted a write up on my brewing rig. I included data on time to temp using two 1500v elements.

Here's the link:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/my-...d-pics-342786/

Here's how long it takes to heat tap water to strike temp:
Minutes Temp
0 80
9 110
13 118
17 129
22 142
29 163


Hope this helps!
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Old 07-21-2012, 11:06 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarrat
Dude.... thats SLOW. You should be able to get up to that temp in half the time.. or less... Try using a lid and and or insulate your brew kettle....
It's insulated, 7 gallons. What's your rate?
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Old 07-21-2012, 11:57 PM   #10
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29 minutes to strike temps seems reasonable...it takes me that long to measure and crush grain I guess....

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