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Old 11-21-2013, 03:33 PM   #1
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Default DIN this, Done that - how did you DIN your panel?

I have been spending time placing and thinking and drawing and then redoing. I think I need the collective mind to show me the way to glorious ebrewing utopia.

Which option worked best for you or you wish :
1) long rows of din mounted components
2) short rows with segmentation of parts plated together. Breakers and coils on a rail. All power on another.
3) I just went for it and it worked

If you could send a pic of your internals (keeping in mind safely) along with what your theory was behind the design. It would help me out a bunch. I start my cut, drill, and wire next week.

P.s. I know this was brought up on the show me your panel thread but I thought this would be better broken out for future use.

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Old 11-21-2013, 03:43 PM   #2
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I'm in the same position and would also love some suggestions!

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Old 11-21-2013, 04:37 PM   #3
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I'm planning on short rows. I'm using DIN mounted breakers and terminal/distribution blocks but the contactors, low voltage power supplies etc. will be mounted directly to the backplate.

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Old 11-21-2013, 04:44 PM   #4
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Depends on your box and your components. Stop fretting. Just start building it. If, in the middle of the wiring job, you realize you should have done it a different way, then rip it apart and do it that way. 12 gauge wire is pretty cheap. It's a hobby and it's supposed to be fun and educational. You're not on the clock.

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Old 11-21-2013, 07:16 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LandoLincoln View Post
Depends on your box and your components. Stop fretting. Just start building it. If, in the middle of the wiring job, you realize you should have done it a different way, then rip it apart and do it that way. 12 gauge wire is pretty cheap. It's a hobby and it's supposed to be fun and educational. You're not on the clock.
I agree . I wanted to get mine finished and test it before fretting too much about what the BEST way was. I wanted the WORKING way first! Its always exciting to hear that *clunk* of the contactor firing and no smoke showing up.
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Old 11-21-2013, 08:58 PM   #6
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I looked at DIN, but it didn't seem to be beneficial if you're doing a Kal clone. It seems unlikely I'll need to service/replace parts that are attached to the back plate often, and there aren't that many components anyway. If you start putting in breakers, internal SSR heat sinks, etc. then it would make more sense.

Edit: I see now that you actually already went the DIN route, in that case just jump in. The great thing about it is you can move components around so easily.

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Old 11-22-2013, 01:03 PM   #7
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This advice goes beyond using DIN rail but applies just the same.
Generally speaking, you need to avoid mounting the long side of any DIN rail too close to any enclosure edges since you typically connect wiring to both sides of components mounted on the DIN rail.

The nice thing about panel layout is you can layout the parts and pieces without actually installing them. This allows you to see how things all fit together.

Don't start cutting and drilling until you have played around with the physical layout of the components in a least a couple different configurations.

For front panels, tape a piece of paper on it and sketch out the location of switches , displays, controllers, etc.

Remember to think in three dimensions. The front panel components that project into the panel interior need adequate clearance so they don't interfere with the stuff mounted on the sub-panel.

Bottom line is, don't start cutting the panel up until you know where the stuff is going to mount. This can save you a lot of rework and avoid those unsightly "oops" holes.

Also think about the placement of openings in the box for strain reliefs, connectors, sockets, or conduit.

Make sure your panel enclosure has enough area for the footprint of all the stuff that needs to go inside. I know this sounds obvious, but until you have assembled a few panels, you may not realize the amount of space that is needed for everything to assemble properly.

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Old 11-22-2013, 02:47 PM   #8
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Thanks process. It took me 3 months to finally decide on the panel layout using cad then put it on the panel and loved it. Maybe I need to 3-d model the panel.

I tired 4 different configurations and found one I really like but need to close the door with PID installed to make sure they clear.

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Old 11-22-2013, 03:36 PM   #9
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I did have a momentary "oops" when I realized that I hadn't considered one aspect of the 3rd dimension. Things that stick out the back of the front panel and are close to the edge can potentially hit the frame when the panel swings out.

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Old 11-22-2013, 03:44 PM   #10
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Quote:
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I did have a momentary "oops" when I realized that I hadn't considered one aspect of the 3rd dimension. Things that stick out the back of the front panel and are close to the edge can potentially hit the frame when the panel swings out.
Didn't even occur to me. Wow, that is something to look for before I drill. Thanks for warning us!
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