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Old 12-06-2011, 01:11 PM   #11
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Auber makes a DC PID SYL-2362B which can be powered by 12-30 VDC. Would that one work?

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Old 12-06-2011, 05:03 PM   #12
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No differences. Internally, the PID runs everything off 12VDC anyway. When you connect higher voltage than this, it drops it down. When you connect AC, it recitifies it and makes it DC.



I don't think there are any con's other the possible the availability of components like fuses, switches, contactors, etc.

But I don't think there are any pro's to doing this, more imporantly. If you are concerned about the risk of electric shock, then you just need to make sure you limit the current going to the controls on the front of the panel. The PIDs need less than 300 mA of current, so if you put a tiny fuse on the line that feeds power up to the face of your panel, you can control everything with low current devices.

DC is not any safer than AC when you get down to the basics of it. And it's not voltage that is important, but AMPS. You can kill yourself with a 12VDC car battery, because that thing has the capacity to send a LOT of amps through you.
While it's true that it's current that kills you, it's only part of the story.

300mA is more than enough to stop the heart (which is incidently why a 12v could actually kill) BUT here's the difference and why low voltage is safer to work around:

Skin resistance. Skin typically toss out about 1-4kohms of resistance.

V=IR, and higher voltages result in higher currents. 12v to skin results in a miniscule amount of current. 220V results in a not minscule amount. That's why GFCI's are designed to trip off around 5mA of stray current.

A 300mA fuse probably won't pop if it's going through you, but depending on where it goes (worst is a way that sends it through your heart) it could be dangerous.

as for how 12v could kill? if the voltage was put in subcutaneous...it'll conduct through the blood, which is much more conductive.
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Old 12-06-2011, 05:33 PM   #13
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Quote:
Auber makes a DC PID SYL-2362B which can be powered by 12-30 VDC. Would that one work?
would a device rated for 12v run on 12volts? im pretty sure it would....

[quote]The Auber PIDs require a minimum of 85V to operate according to the website.
[/uqote]
those are A/C. the voltage transformer on the thing will run on any AC input from 85 to 200-something volts. the internal electronic bits still run on 12v DC though. they make a model that runs on strait 12v DC too. it just has a voltage regulator instead of a transformer too.
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Old 12-06-2011, 05:44 PM   #14
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would a device rated for 12v run on 12volts? im pretty sure it would....

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The Auber PIDs require a minimum of 85V to operate according to the website.
those are A/C. the voltage transformer on the thing will run on any AC input from 85 to 200-something volts. the internal electronic bits still run on 12v DC though. they make a model that runs on strait 12v DC too. it just has a voltage regulator instead of a transformer too.
Yup. I didn't see that DC one down there on the page. My bad.
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Old 12-06-2011, 08:57 PM   #15
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a bennifit of DC current... components are cheap! fuses, switches, fuse holders, lights, ect... go to the automotive section it is a lot cheaper than $25 for a 120V bus bar plus fuse holders you can get them combined like this...

Amazon.com: Bussmann BP/15600-06-20 Quick Connect Fuse Block: Automotive

not to mention cheaper wire and connectors.

edit: bennifit of low voltage DC current

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