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Old 06-28-2012, 01:03 PM   #31
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The zinc plating will dissolve into the wort at that pH. That might present a health risk. Once the zinc was dissolved you would be down to the copper plating layer over the base metal of the element. I'd look for an Inconel element if possible, it's very corrosion resistant.

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Old 06-28-2012, 03:34 PM   #32
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Check out www.bostonheatingsupply.com for large selection of copper and stainless steel elements. That's where I get mine.

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Old 06-28-2012, 03:35 PM   #33
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The zinc plating will dissolve into the wort at that pH. That might present a health risk.
It's the "might" part that I'm interested in. I've been doing some searching, but can't find anything conclusive. There are probably many, many brewers who have used the zinc plated elements. Are any of you growing a third nut?



I did find this thread.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:32 PM   #34
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My Camco 02853 came from hardwareandtools.com today. No better than Amazon. I got the same mislabled 02852 element from them too. Now I just have to hope that their return policy is as good as Amazon.

Going to give the Drill Spot element a try.
I did the same thing, and ordered the 02853 from Amazon. It arrived the stubby one too, with label of 02852. I called Camco. The lady on the phone said the 02582 is the part number of the base. She said they changed designs, and it is now more "efficient" to have the smaller element. She assured me it was the right element, and indeed was ULWD. I am not exactly sold though.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:45 PM   #35
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She assured me it was the right element, and indeed was ULWD. I am not exactly sold though.
Since watt density is measured in watts per square inch, how can you reduce the surface area while keeping the same wattage and call it the same watt density? Sure, it still puts out the same amount of heat, but I think "more efficient" means cheaper for them to manufacture.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:46 PM   #36
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Since watt density is measured in watts per square inch, how can you reduce the surface area while keeping the same wattage and call it the same watt density? Sure, it still puts out the same amount of heat, but I think "more efficient" means cheaper for them to manufacture.
Didn't exactly make sense to me either.
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Old 06-28-2012, 07:27 PM   #37
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It's the "might" part that I'm interested in. I've been doing some searching, but can't find anything conclusive. There are probably many, many brewers who have used the zinc plated elements. Are any of you growing a third nut?
No, but I DID grow a second.....
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Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
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Old 06-29-2012, 04:30 AM   #38
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If zinc were a problem then electric water heaters would not contain zinc plated elements. And all water heaters, gas or electric, would not contain zinc sacrificial anodes. But they do and the zinc from these parts bleeds into your hot water every day.

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Old 06-29-2012, 01:09 PM   #39
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If zinc were a problem then electric water heaters would not contain zinc plated elements. And all water heaters, gas or electric, would not contain zinc sacrificial anodes. But they do and the zinc from these parts bleeds into your hot water every day.
Electric water heaters aren't exposed to an acidic environment like our boil kettles and RIMS systems are.

I thought most sacrificial anodes were magnesium.
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Old 06-29-2012, 01:53 PM   #40
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Wurt is not that acidic which is why you can use copper and brass fittings in brewpots. Beer gets more acidic as it ferments and the acidity shows on the inside of any brass fittings, like brass faucets you may have installed in your kegerator. And BTW, modern brass is a alloy of copper and zinc. The anodes are zinc, not magnesium. Magnesium would react violently with water.

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