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Old 02-08-2012, 09:48 PM   #1
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Default Bayou Classic with Induction?

Is anyone using a Bayou Classic 1036/1136 (36qt stainless pot) with an induction cooker? Does it seem to work?

I'm thinking about picking up an 1136, the Max Burton 6000 1800w induction cooktop, and going for a semi-BIAB. I'd do a 1.5qt/lb mash in the big pot, heat up sparge water on my stove, sparge into pot and then boil.

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Old 02-26-2012, 02:04 PM   #2
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Bumping this after an induction search.

I've been using a 3500 watt conventional hot plate. Works, but the plate it self is thick and slow to heat and cool. I have to remove the pot from the plate at the end of the boil or it will continue boiling for quite a while. Also, I chill with an IC, so the heat retained by the plate makes it necessary to get it off ASAP. It's not too big a problem for 5 gallon batches, but difficult with an 11 gallon boil.

I'm hoping that a 3500 watt induction plate will eliminate this problem. I have a 62 quart Bayou pot that is magnetic. What I'm wondering is how the non-clad, relatively thin base will effect efficiency? From what I’ve read, the induction plate heats the metal which then heats the contents and that a thinner material will heat faster. What I haven’t found is if a thicker base will actually help in bringing a relatively thin liquid like wort to a boil faster? I’m sure that a thicker or clad base would spread out the heat and help prevent scorching of thick sauces, but will it effect actual boil time?

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Old 02-26-2012, 03:16 PM   #3
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Induction is the effect of a changing magnetic field causing electric "eddy" currents in a metal, which then causes the metal to heat up. Depending on how strong the magnetic field is, it seems like there would be a magnetic field beyond the boundary of the metal, so that portion of the magnetic field would not cause eddy currents, therefore not increasing the heat flow. So I would guess that a thicker pot, if that extra thickness is a metal affected by induction, would be a more efficient use of the magnetic output of the induction burner, and heat up faster.

Or I could be totally wrong, talking out my @$$.

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Old 02-26-2012, 05:50 PM   #4
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Actually, with induction, thinner is better. You need a metal that is both magnetically susceptible, AND has enough resistivity to convert the induced electrical current into heat.

AnOldUR: what's the model number for your 62 quart pot? I called Bayou Classic and talked to someone who was very friendly, but had no idea which pots were magnetic and which weren't.

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Old 02-26-2012, 06:06 PM   #5
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Interesting read. Thanks belmontbrew. It looks like in a 400 series stainless, all the heating action is taking place in the .007" skin depth of the material and that the heat will transfer to the liquid so thickness is not important as long as scorching is not an issue.

My pot is the Bayou Classic 1060. I got a reply from an email to Bayou that said, "The distributor tells me that they are 304 stainless but will not work on an induction stove."

I know that a magnet is strongly attracted to my pot, so it can't be 304ss.

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Old 02-26-2012, 06:26 PM   #6
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Does the magnet attract to the sides of the pot or just the bottom?

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Old 02-26-2012, 06:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaleHair View Post
Does the magnet attract to the sides of the pot or just the bottom?
Both. There is no layering in the Bayou pots. The walls are the same thickness and material as the bottom, about 1/32".
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Old 02-26-2012, 06:51 PM   #8
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From Wikipedia

Stainless steel pans will often work on an induction hob provided the sole of the pan is a grade of stainless steel that is magnetic. If a magnet sticks well to the sole of the pan, it will work on an induction hob.

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Old 02-26-2012, 07:05 PM   #9
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SS can be magnetic - when it is, it just means that no nickel has been added to strenghten the metal. At least that's what I remember reading a while back when I discovered my Bayou Classic would attract a magnet

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Old 02-26-2012, 07:31 PM   #10
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I bought this in Amazon for $75 and had to return it. I does not even heat up the entire bottom, literally a little portion of the bottom.

I you making tea this is great but not for beer.

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