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-   -   Anyone Using RIMS for 1 BBL batches? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f170/anyone-using-rims-1-bbl-batches-379330/)

BBL_Brewer 01-07-2013 05:12 AM

Anyone Using RIMS for 1 BBL batches?
 
I'm thinking about trading for a RIMS tube but I can't seem to find much information on brewing large batches with RIMS. Is anyone doing this? If so, what size heating element would I need and would one tube/element suffice? I'm not planning on stepping, just maintaining mash temp, although being able to jump a few degrees would be nice.

Bsquared 01-08-2013 03:49 AM

I can't help you, but I've been some what un-impressed with my HERMS system with 12 gallon batches and its ability to raise the temp of the mash fo step mashes and mash out steps. for holding temps it works fine, but I just can't do step mashes like I can with 6 gallon batches. I'm going to install one of these 1-1/2 RIMS tubes from Glacier tanks into my system. I figure If I want to go to a 1 to 2bbl system Im going to need a RIMS system.

I'm curious with what others will say about this.

BBL_Brewer 01-10-2013 11:54 PM

bump

Ajgeo 01-11-2013 12:37 AM

Take a look over at probrewer. From what I have read, mashes for batches 1bbl and up usually have enough thermal mass to maintain temperature long enough for conversion. Are you loosing a lot of heat during your 1bbl mashes?

mattd2 01-11-2013 12:49 AM

As Ajgeo said, what temp loss are you getting over an hour mash? basically one you know this, the mass of grain and assume it is "water" you can calculate what you require as a minimum element power, double or tripple that and you will give yourself a good margin to accuont for those assumptions :D

BBL_Brewer 01-11-2013 12:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ajgeo (Post 4772053)
Take a look over at probrewer. From what I have read, mashes for batches 1bbl and up usually have enough thermal mass to maintain temperature long enough for conversion. Are you loosing a lot of heat during your 1bbl mashes?

I loose 2-3 degrees F per hour if I leave it sealed up. But the problem is I get temperature stratification and have to stir periodically which in turn sheds more heat. I'd like to recirc through a RIMS tube to keep a uniform mash temp and compensate for minor heat loss. Looks more appealing to me than HERMS and it wouldn't add any extra heat in my basement (which can be a problem).

Edit

I'd also like to be able to jump a few degrees if I needed to. Like if I undershoot my infusion. I also don't know how big of an element I could use without scorching the wort. The tube I'm thinkiing about getting is a stout tanks RIMS module. It's 2" by 2'.

mattd2 01-11-2013 01:10 AM

Making some huge(ly conservative) assumptions.
5C temp loss over a 60 minute mash with 100kg of mash (72kg water + 28 kg grain) would need under 1kW to maintain the temp. So any "normal" rims tube I have seen build on here should be fine for just maintaning the temp.

in imperial thats about 9F / 20 gal strike water / 62# grain

BBL_Brewer 01-11-2013 02:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mattd2 (Post 4772178)
Making some huge(ly conservative) assumptions.
5C temp loss over a 60 minute mash with 100kg of mash (72kg water + 28 kg grain) would need under 1kW to maintain the temp. So any "normal" rims tube I have seen build on here should be fine for just maintaning the temp.

in imperial thats about 9F / 20 gal strike water / 62# grain

I average 65-70 lbs grain and 25-28 gallons of water.

NiteOwlBrewing 01-11-2013 04:13 AM

But you're losing only a few degrees F or 1-2 degrees C. My best results (coming from a lowly 1/2bbl brewer) is to mash in with 1.1 quarts/lb and use up to the 1.3 ratio to adjust temp. I jack up a bit of water in the hlt at dough in for this...with reflectix, circulation and heat tape (with pid control) at 400w I maintain for 45-75 min mashes my strike. Still haven't mashed out without infusion...

jammin 01-11-2013 04:21 AM

I think a 240 volt/5500 watt ULWD element would be bang on. Lots of surface area so you would get very efficient heat transfer, especially at higher flow volume (for your bigger system). Camco makes a straight, folded model that would be perfect. I have one in my 20 gallon kettle and it (dis)assembles easily in 1.5" tri clover system.


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