Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > 240V 5500W 30A 50L ebiab keggle conversion w/recirculation [pics]
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-30-2013, 11:26 PM   #11
shuckit
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Victoria, BC
Posts: 215
Liked 10 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by craigmw View Post
First, how quick does a typical batch (e.g. 7.5 gallons) of water come up to strike temp, and then from strike/mashout to boil? I like BIAB for the potential shortening of a brew day vs. traditional RIMS. Second, how did you enclose the electrical side of the heater element? Third, is the pump simply there to feed the CFC chiller, or are you using it to recirculate during heating of the strike water, and/or during the mash?

BTW, I was just up in Victoria in early August. It's just beautiful up there. Does it really get that cold?
1. Heats quick, 20-25 minutes to strike, then 15 minutes to boil. Like jeffmeh said. I've got mine on a 30amp circuit. 2. For the electrical element enclosure, I followed Kal's advice on his website, electricbrewery. 3. I use the pump to recirc during the mash and I whirlpool while I chill. I have the electric element on to keep mash temps and not get temp stratification. 4. It gets rainy and windy in the winter up here. It's a damp cold. Much prefer brewing in shorts and sandals in my basement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kal View Post
Nicely documented - congrats on the new setup
Thanks for the help!
__________________
240V EBIAB Build Thread
shuckit is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-31-2013, 03:41 PM   #12
kal
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,175
Liked 216 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Here's a couple of handy links for calculating how much power you need or how fast temperature rises when using an electric setup:

http://www.brewheads.com/powerrequired.php
http://www.brewheads.com/rise.php

Kal

kal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2013, 10:18 PM   #13
craigmw
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Villa Park, CA
Posts: 188
Liked 18 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Thanks Shuckit and Kal. It certainly looks like electric is an option, especially given a nearby 240V/30A outlet. I'm thinking about building a "convertible" kettle that would allow me to do automated electric brews, similar to the system built here, for when I'm home. When brewing with buddies, it would be nice to be able to brew on propane, so I'm thinking about rigging up a tri-clover port to accept one of BobbyNJ's triclover heater element housing rigs, and then plug the hole with a triclover plate for brewing on gas. Of course, I could just spring for another kettle!

BTW, how do you regulate the boil? Is there a way to use PWM once the boil is in progress to control the boil-off rate? It doesn't seem like a good idea to have the system running full power after a boil is achieved. I can see how the PID can control the appropriate temps for mash and mashout, etc, but once boil is reached, temperature control doesn't seem a reliable method. Does the rig described here have some way to activate a PWM during boiling? A second thing that concerns me is the potential for running the element dry. Does anyone sell an element that shuts down if the element runs dry (and starts to overheat)? If not, would it be possible to measure amperage draw to prevent overheating?

__________________
craigmw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2013, 10:59 PM   #14
kal
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,175
Liked 216 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by craigmw View Post
BTW, how do you regulate the boil? Is there a way to use PWM once the boil is in progress to control the boil-off rate? It doesn't seem like a good idea to have the system running full power after a boil is achieved. I can see how the PID can control the appropriate temps for mash and mashout, etc, but once boil is reached, temperature control doesn't seem a reliable method. Does the rig described here have some way to activate a PWM during boiling?
Both PWM and PIDs run in manual mode allow for duty cycle to be set to control the amount of boil.

Quote:
A second thing that concerns me is the potential for running the element dry. Does anyone sell an element that shuts down if the element runs dry (and starts to overheat)? If not, would it be possible to measure amperage draw to prevent overheating?
Not possible.The element draws as much current whether it's in water or air. The ripple elements used a lot by brewers are a bit immune to frying, or at least they don't fry as soon after firing one up in air like non-ripple elements.

Kal
kal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2013, 11:50 PM   #15
craigmw
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Villa Park, CA
Posts: 188
Liked 18 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Kal:

I guess this is not as big a deal as for a RIMS tube, where running low on wort could cause things to go boom.

It would still be nice to come up with a fail-safe for electric kettles. I imagine that I would mostly use this outside, but on a rainy day, I have a 240/30 receptacle in the garage. I would love a little extra insurance against stupidity. It's unlikely that would ever happen, but as I plan to automate this with a Raspberry Pi, it doesn't seem like too much trouble to add a an extra thermocouple to check element temp, or just measure amp draw through the circuit. As I understand it, those elements are made of a stainless alloy. This should have a reasonably large increase in resistance as temperature increases. So in theory, a significant drop in current would indicate a lack of boiling wort. Again, not a huge deal in my own brewing, but this could significantly improve safety, especially in RIMS tube configurations. Am I totally off-base on this?

Again, thanks for all of the excellent documentation of your build(s).

__________________
craigmw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-02-2013, 01:21 AM   #16
kal
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,175
Liked 216 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I don't think what you suggest is plausible or easily achievable. Sorry!

I think it's simpler to have a brew process in place that negates having to worry about all this to begin with. Design the setup and process properly and you won't have to worry about it. That's what I do.

I have an interlock on my control panel that doesn't allow it to be turned on if any of the elements are in the on position. That's by far the biggest safety feature that avoids having an element fire by mistake. Then I heat the strike/sparge water only after I've filled the HLT all the way, I don't sparge while the HLT element is on (so the level can't drop below), and I only fire the boil kettle element once the kettle is full.

I've gotten rid of all the "oops I forgot..." situations in my brewing process such that worrying about dry firing elements is a non-issue.

YMMV.

Kal

__________________
TheElectricBrewery.com: A step by step guide to building your own electric brewery
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
kal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-02-2013, 05:38 PM   #17
craigmw
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Villa Park, CA
Posts: 188
Liked 18 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kal View Post
I don't think what you suggest is plausible or easily achievable. Sorry!

I think it's simpler to have a brew process in place that negates having to worry about all this to begin with. Design the setup and process properly and you won't have to worry about it. That's what I do.

I have an interlock on my control panel that doesn't allow it to be turned on if any of the elements are in the on position. That's by far the biggest safety feature that avoids having an element fire by mistake. Then I heat the strike/sparge water only after I've filled the HLT all the way, I don't sparge while the HLT element is on (so the level can't drop below), and I only fire the boil kettle element once the kettle is full.

I've gotten rid of all the "oops I forgot..." situations in my brewing process such that worrying about dry firing elements is a non-issue.

YMMV.

Kal
Coming up with ideas that are neither "plausible or easily achievable" is my specialty.

Perhaps the interlock system and some common sense during brew sessions are more practical solutions.
__________________
craigmw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-03-2013, 03:02 PM   #18
jonurban
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jonurban's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 32
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts

Default

You could put an IR sensor or float valve in which would shut off the relay if the min wart level was off, but I don't think it's worth the trouble.

__________________
jonurban is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2013, 07:23 PM   #19
LandoLincoln
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
LandoLincoln's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Joliet, IL
Posts: 2,209
Liked 572 Times on 330 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonurban View Post
You could put an IR sensor or float valve in which would shut off the relay if the min wort level was off, but I don't think it's worth the trouble.
Oh, I think it's worth the trouble. I get distracted when brewing a lot, and swapping out heating elements is a real pain.
__________________
www.jolietbrewersguild.org
LandoLincoln is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2013, 06:51 AM   #20
jonurban
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jonurban's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 32
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts

Default

this might do what you need:

Product Description:
This switch will open or close the electric circuit when liquid level reaches a specific position. It can be used to activate a pump when liquid level is low, or to open the heating circuit to prevent the damage of the heater. For activating the pump when liquid level is low, the sensor tip should be mounted downwards as shown in the picture below. For cutting off the heating circuit when liquid level is low, the sensor tip should be mounted upwards. Since the switch is rated for 0.8 Amp, a typical wiring is to put it in series with relay (or solid state relay) control loop.

Specification
Float Switch(stainless steel Float Switch,Liquid Switch)
Rated voltage: 220VAC/24VDC
Rated curent: 0.8A
Insulation Impedance: >10MΩ
Applied pressure :20/50 Pa
Working temperature: -10 ºC~130 ºC (14 ºF~266 ºF)
Cable length: 17 inch

http://www.auberins.com/index.php?ma...roducts_id=324

__________________
jonurban is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help with eHerms - 240v/5500w elements Cioffi Electric Brewing 3 02-16-2013 10:54 PM
eBIAB Keggle conversion setup: feeling overwhelmed govain Electric Brewing 2 11-18-2011 05:49 PM
eBIAB Keggle conversion setup: some help please govain Kettles, Mash Tuns, & Hot Liquor Tanks 0 09-20-2011 07:38 AM
120v/2000w & 240v/5500w together in keggle Flyin Electric Brewing 11 09-17-2011 06:42 AM
Would you buy this 5500W 240V RIPP?? Gabrew Equipment/Sanitation 6 06-27-2010 07:10 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS