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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > 110v Recirculating eBIAB 2.5 gallon batches
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Old 09-06-2012, 02:57 PM   #91
EvilDeadAsh
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Does it matter which lines are where though? From the diagram it seems like the ground from the heating element, pump, e-stop, as well as the "line 1" (hot?) from each of the switches, and neutral are all going to the terminal block - or am i misinterpreting the icons in the top left?

Does it all wind up at the terminal block, which is in turn wired to a male plug which goes into the GFCI protected wall outlet?

This seems like elementary stuff, I know, but just want to make sure I understand what I am looking at so I don't burn down my house.

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Old 09-06-2012, 03:15 PM   #92
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^totally understand.

The terminal block simply creates a group of "plug ins" for each respective line: ground, neutral and line 1.

You will want a terminal block to run all your line 1 and neutral elements b/c you simply can't use a wire nut for that many wires; with the exception of the ground I suppose (since there are only 3).

But yes, the terminal block essentially leads to the cord you plug into your 110 volt outlet on the wall.

Some folks may choose to have separate terminal blocks to run neutral and hot; thus using 2 terminal blocks. If you look at the excellent wiring diagram P-J drew up, you can wire up a terminal block to tie all your neutral wires too. That particular terminal block would in turn be wired to the neutral line coming from your wall outlet. You would do this again with line 1 on a separate terminal block.

Does that help? This stuff sounds more confusing than it really is.

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Old 09-06-2012, 03:23 PM   #93
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No that makes sense, thanks very much. I knew about this stuff ages ago when I needed it for work but it has long since been forgotten and not needed until now, so I appreciate the help.

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Old 09-06-2012, 03:59 PM   #94
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Like jammin said its simply a strip to connect all of your wires of the same type. The terminal block I linked to actually has two separate blocks on it. I used one for all the hot wires, and one for all the neutrals. I did simply wire nut all the ground wires since there was only a few of them.

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Old 09-08-2012, 12:17 AM   #95
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Default PID function TIP!

I finally figured out how to adjust power as a percentage in manual mode. This might be trivial to some, but was a little difficult for me to figure out. The manual seemed to leave out a piece of key info.. which is what I want to point out.



To run the PID in manual mode..

Hold SET down until you get into the parameter adjustments.

Click SET until you reach A-M.

Set A-M to 1.

- Now manual mode is enabled.

Click A/M to turn the the unit to manual mode and disengage PID functionality.

Click SET to change the display's set value (SV) from temperature to percentage.

Arrow up or down to adjust power output percentage.

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Old 09-12-2012, 05:37 PM   #96
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Default Contactors in a 120V system

PJ,

I have a question about the following diagram:

Quote:
Originally Posted by P-J View Post
As always - Click on the image to see a full scale diagram printable on Tabloid paper (11" x 17")


P-J
You are showing the Element switch actuating a contactor. I fully understand the use of the contactor in the 220V versions: many do not wish to touch a switch carrying 220V directly with "possibly" wet fingers - although there are some control panels such as jsguitar's where 220V switches are used.

1. Are you doing this in order to make it easier to convert this controller to 220V later should the brewer desire? I "think" that possibility was mentioned later in the thread.

2. Are you using the contactor because of the amount of amps (as opposed to volts) that would be traveling thru the element circuit?

I'm really interested in this design as well. It makes me think that there might be some virtue in converting my 7.5 gallon kettle into a small e-kettle for making 2.5 - 3 gallon batches.

Thanks,
Keith
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Old 09-12-2012, 06:21 PM   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kzimmer0817 View Post
PJ,

I have a question about the following diagram:


You are showing the Element switch actuating a contactor. I fully understand the use of the contactor in the 220V versions: many do not wish to touch a switch carrying 220V directly with "possibly" wet fingers - although there are some control panels such as jsguitar's where 220V switches are used.

1. Are you doing this in order to make it easier to convert this controller to 220V later should the brewer desire? I "think" that possibility was mentioned later in the thread.

2. Are you using the contactor because of the amount of amps (as opposed to volts) that would be traveling thru the element circuit?

I'm really interested in this design as well. It makes me think that there might be some virtue in converting my 7.5 gallon kettle into a small e-kettle for making 2.5 - 3 gallon batches.

Thanks,
Keith
Keith,

The design was implemented the way it is because jrb03 wanted a specific design using Auber Instruments illuminated push button switches (first post - this thread).

The particular switch (Model: SW1) is rated for 10A. This means that any element running on 120V at 1200W (or more) cannot be directly controlled with the PB switch. The contactor then becomes an easy solution. A huge side benefit is that the controller can be easily converted to a 240V system with very simple wiring changes. The switch also functions well on either 120 or 240V including the switch illumination.

Later on in the thread (post #33) I show a diagram for a 2 element system. This also can be easily converted to 240V with easy wiring changes. Going to 240V with this plan would allow the system to be changed to a 2 kettle setup (HLT/BOIL) later on. The contactors help a lot with a conversion plan.

I hope this makes sense.

P-J
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Old 09-12-2012, 07:01 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P-J View Post
Keith,
The design was implemented the way it is because jrb03 wanted a specific design using Auber Instruments illuminated push button switches (first post - this thread).

The particular switch (Model: SW1) is rated for 10A. This means that any element running on 120V at 1200W (or more) cannot be directly controlled with the PB switch. The contactor then becomes an easy solution. A huge side benefit is that the controller can be easilt converted to a 240V system with very simple wiring changes. The switch also functions well on either 120 or 240V including the switch illumination. <snip<
I hope this makes sense.

P-J
It does make sense. Thanks. I knew that the OP had asked for a specific design, but I was wondering if there was a "scientific" reason for doing it. I figured that it was because, allthough the Auber pushbutton is rated for 120V, it is not capable of carrying the amperes required by the element. I guess the physician in me causes me to over-think many things - as might be apparent from all the unanswered questions in my own "planning" thread. I fear that I've worn out my welcome on the Electric Brewing forum.

Thanks again for all the help you provide to folks building their electric rigs. Since we'll be moving in 2 months to a house that has a great place for brewing (and electric brewing), I hope to get started on my own controller then.

Respectfully,
Keith
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Old 09-19-2012, 05:43 PM   #99
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Is there any way I could use 12v switches like this one (https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11311) with this setup?

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Old 09-19-2012, 05:52 PM   #100
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edit: removed my entire post as it seems I am probably completely incorrect and dont want to steer the convo the wrong way. hoping someone else can answer correctly

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