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Old 06-14-2013, 06:06 AM   #1
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Default 110V for 10 Gallon Batches - Possible?

Hi All,

I am looking into converting my keggle which I use for 10 Gallon BIAB batches to an electric system. I will be frequently moving over the next few years and I have no way of guaranteeing reliable access to 220V. I haven't found any other posts with people doing batches this large with a 110V system. I like the BIAB as it is easy take with me when I am moving frequently and I like the idea of going electric and not having to carry around a turkey fryer too!

I am thinking of using 2-3 Camco 02852/02853 1500W 120V Screw-In Lime Life Foldback Water Heater Element - Ultra Low Watt Density (http://www.amazon.com/Camco-02853-Sc...I17Q911OBPKUDI).

Does anyone have any experience with doing 10 gallon batches on 110V? Do you think 2 of those elements would be enough to get up to boil with a full keggle? Any thoughts or insights would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

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Old 06-14-2013, 01:34 PM   #2
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Use the spreadsheet found here to determine how much time given an amount of energy to get water from one temp to another.

I use one 4500w/240v element to boil 10 gallons and I do that at 70% power. I would think 2 should get the job done. You need to make sure they are on separate breakers/circuits in order for it to work.

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Old 06-14-2013, 04:20 PM   #3
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I would do two 2000w elements plugged into different circuits.

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Old 06-14-2013, 04:47 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinga View Post
I would do two 2000w elements plugged into different circuits.
That would be better, but then one would need two different 20a circuits. That would be less flexible than going with two 1500w elements, as two 15a circuits are more likely to be available if one is moving from place to place.

It looks like if you started a 10 gal BIAB batch with 15 gal water at 55F it would take about 75 minutes to reach 152F. Then let's say 12.5 gal are left after the mash for the boil, that would take another 40 minutes or so to boil. Insulating the kettle would be a very good idea.
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:03 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by jeffmeh View Post
That would be better, but then one would need two different 20a circuits. That would be less flexible than going with two 1500w elements, which are more common if one is moving from place to place.

It looks like if you started a 10 gal BIAB batch with 15 gal water at 55F it would take about 75 minutes to reach 152F. Then let's say 12.5 gal are left after the mash for the boil, that would take another 40 minutes or so to boil. Insulating the kettle would be a very good idea.
correct me if i'm wrong but you will need two separate circuits for running 2 1500w elements as well.

unless you're implying 15 amp circuits are more common than 20 amp circuits. Which you;re probably correct but most houses now are wired with 2 20 amp circuits in the kitchen for kitchen appliances.
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:08 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinga View Post
correct me if i'm wrong but you will need two separate circuits for running 2 1500w elements as well.

unless you're implying 15 amp circuits are more common than 20 amp circuits. Which you;re probably correct but most houses now are wired with 2 20 amp circuits in the kitchen for kitchen appliances.
Yep, I poorly worded it, and corrected it. The 15a circuits are more common.
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:14 PM   #7
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I do 9.25g batches with two 110v elements, one is a 1500w, the other is a 1650. I run the lower one on a 15a and the higher one on a 20a breaker. I have vigorous boils of 11+ gallons of wort.

Yes, you can do it.

On those camco elements, though. Many people have had issues getting the right ones. The 3 I have ended up the high watt density kind, despite being labeled ULWD. If you get short ones, like the length of your finger, they're not ULWD. Longer=lower watt density. Fortunately I use 2 of mine for the HLT, where it doesn't matter, and the other one in the BK doesn't seem to affect anything, but I'm still thinking of replacing it with the Reliance 1650 one day (when I upgrade the breaker/wiring to 20A, too.)

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Old 06-14-2013, 06:38 PM   #8
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Thanks so much for all the replies! I think I will go ahead and order 2 of these, and maybe even a heat stick to help with speeding up the process a bit. I think I will stick with the 1500 watt elements for now just in case I don't have access to two 20A outlets

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Old 06-16-2013, 04:29 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by CCrisfield View Post
I think I will stick with the 1500 watt elements for now just in case I don't have access to two 20A outlets

The only downside would be the additional time required for 10 gallon batches. 4000w total will be a fair bit faster than 3000w IME.

My guess is that the heating charts don't really account for losses, say there is a 500w loss that the 4000w will find easier to overcome than the 3000w system. Basicly just guessing that it results in more than a third more power actually put into the wort...the diference will be substantail.
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Old 06-17-2013, 04:12 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by wilserbrewer View Post
The only downside would be the additional time required for 10 gallon batches. 4000w total will be a fair bit faster than 3000w IME.

My guess is that the heating charts don't really account for losses, say there is a 500w loss that the 4000w will find easier to overcome than the 3000w system. Basicly just guessing that it results in more than a third more power actually put into the wort...the diference will be substantail.
OK, it sounds like I should probably go for an additional heat stick to help with getting up to boil a bit faster. Or maybe I will go with three elements.
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