*Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway - Enter Now!*

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > 110 set up
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-30-2012, 06:16 PM   #11
Budzu
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 793
Liked 16 Times on 15 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boerderij_Kabouter View Post
I wouldn't say 110 brewing is out of the question at all. In fact many of us do just that to great effect. Check out SIMPLE and 2P-Twent-E in my sig and look for jcarp's countertop brutus. Those are all great systems that operate on a single 20amp 11vac outlet available in any kitchen that is up to code. My systems push out 4.25g finished volume into the fermenter and 4 gallons packaged volume per batch.
Second this. I'm using a 2,000 watt element, 5.4 gallon preboil, and I get a 15% or more boiloff per hour. Takes a bit to get up to boil, but nothing unpractical at all.
__________________
Countertop Brutus Budzu-style
Budzu is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-31-2012, 12:45 PM   #12
NoCornOrRice
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Great White North
Posts: 220
Liked 16 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 23

Default

Hmm, I should have been more specific. While Boerderij_Kabouter and others have really nice setups on 110v, I ruled that out as a possibility for me because I would need to brew all the time if I were to meet my (+ friends that come over) present average consumption of about 20 gallons a month. If your friends like beer, a 10 gallon system is highly reccomended, and for that, 110v won't cut it.

__________________
NoCornOrRice is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-31-2012, 12:56 PM   #13
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 61,201
Liked 4506 Times on 3277 Posts
Likes Given: 883

Default

Even if you can't boil a 10 gallon batch with 110, you could do everything else and then just boil outside on the propane burner.

I used to have an HLT with a 110 set up. 1500 w took a long time to heat up the water to strike temp, but it did! I would turn it on when I was having my morning coffee, and then went and crushed the grain and got everything else ready. By then I was ready to mash in, and would proceed.

It wouldn't be feasible to do that in the basement, and then haul 12 gallons outside for the boil, but it's possible to do that in your garage so that you can just do most of it inside the garage if you want to go partially electric.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-31-2012, 01:04 PM   #14
wilserbrewer
BIAB Expert Tailor
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 9 reviews
 
wilserbrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Jersey Shore, Jersey
Posts: 6,850
Liked 458 Times on 386 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoCornOrRice View Post
.... a 10 gallon system is highly reccomended, and for that, 110v won't cut it.
I disagree, 2 110v circuits at 20 amps each will provide 4000w, which is ample for ten gallon batches. I have grown tired of reading, "you need 220v". Not true IME.
wilserbrewer is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-31-2012, 01:18 PM   #15
CoalCracker
Senior Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CoalCracker's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Macungie, Pa
Posts: 1,589
Liked 100 Times on 63 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

^^This. I boil 10 gallon batches with two 2000w heaters. Have been for about 2 years now. Just recently upgraded to a 25 gallon kettle for 20g batches. Will use propane for that though. As long as you have two outlets on separate circuits, you'll be fine.

__________________

coalcrackerbrewing.blogspot.com
Vintage Kegerator Build
1 BBL Tippy Dump

CoalCracker is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-31-2012, 01:37 PM   #16
NoCornOrRice
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Great White North
Posts: 220
Liked 16 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 23

Default

Just went down and double-checked my panel, I don't have any 20amp circuits at 110v. Maybe they are common in new buildings but I've not seen a 20amp /110v circuit anywhere I've lived. Sounds like a good possibility though for 10gallons.

__________________
NoCornOrRice is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-31-2012, 04:59 PM   #17
tre9er
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 4,372
Liked 232 Times on 196 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

15a is fine for up to about 1500watts. I can keep a boil of ~6g. with one 1500w element and insulated (blanket-wrapped) kettle. I'd think 3000w could (slowly) boil a 10g. batch. In fact, my calculations say at 95% efficiency you can boil 14 gallons using 3000w in 37 minutes from a temp of 160 (post-sparge).

__________________

_________________________________
Skal!
Den Faaborg Bryggeri

Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
tre9er is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2012, 05:43 AM   #18
rswear
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Snohomish, WA
Posts: 41
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I use a pair of 110v, 1500w ULD elements in my boil pot. I use two separate circuits to power them. When heating water I have a 1000w bucket heater I will throw in off a 3rd circuit. Then transfer that water into my HLT and move the bucket heater there to maintain the temp. I have an 8 gal. pot and my wort boils up just fine. For 10 gal, I'd consider 3 or 4 1500w elements if I had the separate circuits.

Here is a calculator for amperage: http://www.supercircuits.com/resourc...Amps-Converter

Basically a 110v, 1500w element pulls 13 amps so it’s fine on a 15 amp breaker. I think it depends on how many separate circuits you have access to and how many elements you want to put in your pot. Granted if 220v were a viable option for me I would have gone that way, but my 110v setup works for me.

__________________
rswear is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-10-2012, 02:08 PM   #19
Jarrat
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Chilliwack, BC Canada
Posts: 16
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

if your using 13amps you really should step up to a 20amp breaker..

__________________
Jarrat is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-10-2012, 03:23 PM   #20
wilserbrewer
BIAB Expert Tailor
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 9 reviews
 
wilserbrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Jersey Shore, Jersey
Posts: 6,850
Liked 458 Times on 386 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoCornOrRice View Post
with 110, it will take forever to brew any volume of beer.

I recently set a house record w/ a 1/2 keg (15.5 gallon batch)...initial boil was 18-19 gallons w/ two 120v 2000w elements. I was surprised, didn't time it, but not that long from mash temps to boil, maybe 1/2 hour / 45 minutes.
__________________
wilserbrewer BIAB bags
custom sized BIAB Bags, hop bags and ratchet pulleys at reasonable prices


Http://biabbags.webs.com/
wilserbrewer is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools