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-   -   Wyeast Labs gluten free liquid yeast (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/wyeast-labs-gluten-free-liquid-yeast-235803/)

andrewdell19 03-29-2011 12:02 AM

Wyeast Labs gluten free liquid yeast
 
Not sure if anyone has posted this yet but Wyeast is making two gluten free liquid yeasts:
Wyeast 1272 GF American Ale II™ and Wyeast 2206 GF Bavarian Lager™

http://www.wyeastlab.com/pressrelease_archive_detail.cfm?pressreleaseID=5

Anyone used either of these or is anyone getting their local homebrew store to carry it?

I would love to try one of these as I like liquid yeast in regular brews (when I used to eat gluten). I want to get up the nerve to use liquid yeast (containing gluten) but if I get sick after drinking I dont want to have to throw the whole batch away. When using the regualr liquid yeast you would have about 2 PPM in a 5 gallon batch I do believe and I know that falls waaay below European standards. Bobs Red Mill products used to say "contains less than 5 PPM" but it does not anymore- not sure if they are leaving this info off and if that is the case I have had no probs with Bobs Red Mill and would give the regular liquid yeast a shot.

spaced 03-29-2011 01:33 AM

That article is from '07, I thought I read somewhere that it was discontinued?

DirtbagHB 03-29-2011 02:19 AM

Isolate your own. It's really really easy!

No_Party 03-29-2011 02:48 AM

I do believe they have stopped making them.

andrewdell19 03-29-2011 06:07 PM

Dang well I guess I am late to the party!
Dirtbag- can you get all the different varities of liquid yeast by isolating your own?? I like that liquid yeast has so many more strains than dry yeast.

DKershner 03-29-2011 06:09 PM

Yeah, they stopped making it a few years ago. No plans to start again as of yet.

DirtbagHB 03-30-2011 10:20 PM

yessir, so far as i know, the only difference between GF yeast and regular yeast is the medium its propagated on. so if you can plate and isolate your own yeast, then build up a colony. youre golden. man i should post some pictures.

i dont know what other peoples opinions are, but if i can keep the brewing pipe line flowing. as in: im brewing a batch when im transfering or bottling. i just siphon onto the existing yeast cake instead of pitching fresh. there how ever is a limit to the number of times you want to do this. i think its 6 batches. the yeast start mutating over time and start doing odd things. but this way i dont have to bother with making a new starter for every batch, as long as i can keep the brewing going. however i dont have that much time lately so the pipe line has come to a screaming halt. so i took my latest cake and put it into a sterile quart mason jars and its chilling nicely in my fridge. when i brew my next batch ill proof it with a spoon full of sugar and see if its still viable.

what i would like to do now is figure out how to make a freezable stock, so that way i can accumulate as many yeasties as i, freeze em and come back when i want a particular strain.

andrewdell19 03-30-2011 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DirtbagHB (Post 2790068)
yessir, so far as i know, the only difference between GF yeast and regular yeast is the medium its propagated on. so if you can plate and isolate your own yeast, then build up a colony. youre golden. man i should post some pictures.

i dont know what other peoples opinions are, but if i can keep the brewing pipe line flowing. as in: im brewing a batch when im transfering or bottling. i just siphon onto the existing yeast cake instead of pitching fresh. there how ever is a limit to the number of times you want to do this. i think its 6 batches. the yeast start mutating over time and start doing odd things. but this way i dont have to bother with making a new starter for every batch, as long as i can keep the brewing going. however i dont have that much time lately so the pipe line has come to a screaming halt. so i took my latest cake and put it into a sterile quart mason jars and its chilling nicely in my fridge. when i brew my next batch ill proof it with a spoon full of sugar and see if its still viable.

what i would like to do now is figure out how to make a freezable stock, so that way i can accumulate as many yeasties as i, freeze em and come back when i want a particular strain.

Thanks for the info. Is it really beneficial to have a starter to pitch your yeast? I just open the packet and sprinkle in the wort after it has cooled and in the primary ferm bucket.

DKershner 03-31-2011 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by andrewdell19 (Post 2790129)
Thanks for the info. Is it really beneficial to have a starter to pitch your yeast? I just open the packet and sprinkle in the wort after it has cooled and in the primary ferm bucket.

Dry yeast does not need starters, but the way you are pitching kills half of the yeast. It should be rehydrated in order to maintain full viability.

A cup of 105F water does the trick. Stir, pour.

DirtbagHB 03-31-2011 04:48 PM

here's what i understand about starters and dry yeast. anyone correct me if im totaly wrong. first off i havent had problems using a dry yeast before, there just arent that my varieties to choose from.
there are 2 life stages for yeast. an active stage and a dormant stage. i like to think of it like scifi movies where astronauts have to go in to stasis for long trips to uranus.

so if we take a dormant dry yeast and toss it into the wort. these things have to wake up but some wont, figure out the metabolic pathway they'll use, then slowly but hopefully surely start converting sugar to alcohol, fornicating and multiplying. this takes time. its during this lag time, between pitch time and vigorus fermentation, that the wort can be influenced by contamination of other micro organisms.
compare this to when you have a starter, a nice slurry of active yeast. they are already alive, active and ready to consume sugar, poop alcohol, and fart CO2. they are also as a pretty high concentration so when they are pitched into the wort, they can immediately go to work as well as out compete any sort of contaminant.
heres another analogy. a fat kid in bed asleep takes more time to put ihop out of business than the fat kid waiting to be seated.

with dry yeast, you can proof the yeast prior to pitching. this is done by rehydrating the yeast in some sterile warm water, and after about 15 minutes adding a tablespoon of sugar. if in 15 minutes the yeast is bubbling and foaming its good too go. if its not bubbling and foaming it a expired packet.


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