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Old 11-09-2009, 09:40 PM   #11
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After some more research, I've decided that trying to extract fermentables from oats by themselves is just not worth it. My LHBS can obtain enzymes for conversion but they are mostly for commercial apps. I'm going to toast the oats to obtain a nuttiness and a degree of head retention, but otherwise, any fermentable sugars can come from added sorghum syrup.
So...what are you going to do with them...steep with specialty grains?
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Old 11-10-2009, 02:28 AM   #12
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So...what are you going to do with them...steep with specialty grains?
Steeping them solo. Specialty grains are barley based and still have gluten. All fermentables with be from the sorghum syrup.
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Old 11-10-2009, 02:48 AM   #13
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You can make your own specialty grains...dark roasted gluten free grains, you know...

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Old 11-10-2009, 01:43 PM   #14
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You can make your own specialty grains...dark roasted gluten free grains, you know...
What sort of gluten free grains are you talking about? Some specific names would help.
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Old 11-10-2009, 01:56 PM   #15
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Millet, buckwheat, sorghum, quinoa, amaranth you can get these at grocery stores or specialty stores. I've gotten everything except the sorghum local around here. You could malt them and roast them or just roast them.

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Old 11-10-2009, 02:29 PM   #16
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If you're just aiming for color then you can simply toast the GF grain to the desired darkness. It's actually not that hard to do. If you want a little more flavor from the grains then I would recommend soaking them overnight or during the day before toasting so that the toasting process forms more caramel flavors.

Typical roasting would be something like soak overnight, drain, put in cake pan in oven at 350 for about 45 min. Then stir every 15-20 min until they are the desired darkness. Let them cool then put them in a paper bag for a few days to off-gas, and viola...GF specialty grain!

Here's an example of how much darker you can make your GF beer:


This batch was simply using White Sorghum as the base malt and then roasting my own millet until it was pretty dark...might have been some quinoa in that batch too, can't remember without my notes.

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Old 11-10-2009, 02:38 PM   #17
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If you're just aiming for color then you can simply toast the GF grain to the desired darkness. It's actually not that hard to do. If you want a little more flavor from the grains then I would recommend soaking them overnight or during the day before toasting so that the toasting process forms more caramel flavors.

Typical roasting would be something like soak overnight, drain, put in cake pan in oven at 350 for about 45 min. Then stir every 15-20 min until they are the desired darkness. Let them cool then put them in a paper bag for a few days to off-gas, and viola...GF specialty grain!

Here's an example of how much darker you can make your GF beer:


This batch was simply using White Sorghum as the base malt and then roasting my own millet until it was pretty dark...might have been some quinoa in that batch too, can't remember without my notes.
We're the soaked grains malted at all or just straight from the bag?
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Old 11-10-2009, 03:25 PM   #18
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This batch I actually malted everything and did a did a 104/140/160 cycle with 30 min rests.

For adding color you would probably be fine with a soak and toast. For imparting more and mellower flavor, then you should probably malt.

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Old 11-10-2009, 03:50 PM   #19
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This batch I actually malted everything and did a did a 104/140/160 cycle with 30 min rests.

For adding color you would probably be fine with a soak and toast. For imparting more and mellower flavor, then you should probably malt.
Nice, I'm interested in this 104/140/160 cycle, is it anything similar to what I mentioned here http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/glu...ashing-145160/
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Old 11-11-2009, 03:24 PM   #20
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I made that beer a year ago, and didn't know as much about GF brewing then, so I just followed procedure that's pretty common for non-GF grains.

Thanks for the link! I'll try that top method soon. Considering getting some Amylase Enzymes too so I don't have to worry as much about saving portions of wort with enzymes before boiling etc.

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