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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Too much Amylase?
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Old 07-10-2010, 07:35 PM   #1
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Default Too much Amylase?

Is there any downside to using extra amylase? The Amylase Enzyme Formula I have says 1 tsp per 5 gallons. I'm mashing roasted teff and oatmeal at different temperatures to see if I can get as much out of them as possible; is there any reason not to add a bit more enzyme to make sure the job is getting done? Is the 1 tsp just an approximation based on frugality? Or will it impart bad flavors? From my understanding the enzyme will attach to as much of the appropriate starches as are available, so I would think the more the better.

Any thoughts or experiences are appreciated.

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Old 07-10-2010, 08:09 PM   #2
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Enzymes are not consumed during the conversion process, they do not 'attach' to starches. They grab them, snap the bonds and then move on to other starches. There is an optimum concentration for the process and adding more will not improve conversion.

Temperature is the most important factor in conversion rate.

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Old 07-10-2010, 08:46 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by david_42 View Post
Enzymes are not consumed during the conversion process, they do not 'attach' to starches. They grab them, snap the bonds and then move on to other starches. There is an optimum concentration for the process and adding more will not improve conversion.

Temperature is the most important factor in conversion rate.
Well that's a fantastic bit on info there! Thanks!

So is the temperature needed dependant on the enzyme or the starch? Is there one temperature?

I'm confused by this because I've seen conflicting information from seemingly reliable sources (BYO mag and Palmer and others). That alpha-amylase does it's work at room temp, but others say below 150, then others say bring to boil then add. Most say it gets "denatured" above a certain temp. So I'm trying to put this all together.

My plan right now is to boil my grains to gelatinize the starches, then add enzyme after it cools and let it sit overnight. Then bring it up to 130 for a time, then 150, then boil, add hops, etc.
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Old 07-12-2010, 04:50 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Noontime View Post
Well that's a fantastic bit on info there! Thanks!

So is the temperature needed dependant on the enzyme or the starch? Is there one temperature?

I'm confused by this because I've seen conflicting information from seemingly reliable sources (BYO mag and Palmer and others). That alpha-amylase does it's work at room temp, but others say below 150, then others say bring to boil then add. Most say it gets "denatured" above a certain temp. So I'm trying to put this all together.

My plan right now is to boil my grains to gelatinize the starches, then add enzyme after it cools and let it sit overnight. Then bring it up to 130 for a time, then 150, then boil, add hops, etc.
Your plan seems like it would pretty much maximize the conversion, but make sure to pull the grain out before the second boil.

Also, 122 on the protein rest is what I would use.
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Old 07-12-2010, 06:56 PM   #5
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Thanks dkershner. I ended up doing it all on the way down from the first boil. Which brings me to my next question...is it the same thing? I boiled the grains and let it cool, then at about 160 I added the amylase. It took a very long time to cool, so it was at least 2 to 3 hours before it got down to 150. I just let it sit overnight and it was still warm in the morning.

Do you think there would have been any reason to go through the process the the other way again? raise the temp to 122, 155, etc?

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