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Old 06-22-2011, 09:52 PM   #21
dorklord
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Originally Posted by mrtree View Post
Dorklord, did this stout ever get off the ground?
If so how did it turn out? Any recipe notes?

Well, this stout came out a great deal lighter in color than planned. Actually, it was extremely dark when I transferred to primary, but a lot of that must have been particles of the roasted grain, as a lot of darkness settled out (and the yeast cake/trub left after I transferred to my bottling bucket was almost black).

Right now, the beer tastes a little green, though my friend (who requested it) has drank a couple bottles, and said it tastes kind of like newcastle (only green).

I'll try to remember to take a picture next time I open one. All in all, I'd say that simply increasing the ingredients would be a good place to start (finished product is a little light in body), but I'm not 100% sure what would give it the right color without giving it a 'burnt' taste. Of course, I'm probably a bad one for this because I didn't like stout when I tried it pre-celiac. Maybe more 'burnt' that what I made would be desirable.
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Old 06-22-2011, 10:43 PM   #22
Gengis
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Originally Posted by Lcasanova View Post
I doubt you will get what you are looking for when you mention stout.

WIth all my attempts, I can only get dark brown at best. That's using grains that appear burnt, D2 and a bunch of blackstrap molasses.

Even using BRS over Sorghum wouldn't help. I'm wondering if an all grain recipe with a heavy dose of dark roasted grains is the answer...but how dark, how long to roast those grains...what grain to use, is the real question.

When tax season is over I plan to experiment with quinoa and buckwheat.

Just my 2 cents fellas
I don't want to minimize the splendid efforts of Lcasanova (he's one of my inspirations!), but I've recently malted some oats (sprouting ratio of about 60%--- seeds were perhaps not that fresh) and also malted some quinoa to use it as base malt with some molasses and dark sugar as fermenting adjuncts. I've added roasted white quinoa and roasted oats for color and aromas. My beer is still aging, and I have yet to try it, but in terms of color, it was pretty dark before bottling (I'd say around 55-60 SRM).
Granted, SRM 60 is not that high for a stout, but it's a good start IMHO. I don't use Sorghum at all, maybe that's why I don't get a 'brown' stout. Also, my wort from the roasted oats and quinoa was very dark, and that surely helps.

The gluten-free oat seeds were obtained from Cream Hill Estates. I will try to malt some more right at the end of this year's growing season.

Cheers
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