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Old 03-27-2011, 02:22 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Stout-n-Braggot View Post
You'll need a source of enzymes to convert the oats, otherwise you won't really get much from them besides an almost chalky mouthfeel from the unconverted starch.
For nice color and complexity you can get 2 lbs of honey and carmelize it until it is almost black (I do this for most of my stouts anymore), it gives nice toffee flavors and when it is slightly burnt it gives a bitterness that is somehwat similar to that of heavily roasted grains and malts. Some carmelized honey and molasses will really add a lot to your recipe.

Hey, could you elaborate on the process of caramelizing the honey.


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Old 03-27-2011, 03:28 AM   #12
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I use my brewkettle for this. You need to put the honey in a kettle and heat it until it reaches your desired color, throughout this you need to keep a very close eye on it and stir it often with a long metal spoon. The honey will boil and start to rise, stirring will help keep it down, but sometimes you'll need to reduce the heat until the honey falls.
Once you hit your desired color you'll want to reduce the heat and slowly and carefully add water and let the honey dissolve and simmer *covered* until it is no longer sticking to everything (it will harden when the water is added), simmering it covered will allow the steam to soften the honey sticking to the walls of the kettle.



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Old 03-27-2011, 06:23 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Stout-n-Braggot View Post
I use my brewkettle for this. You need to put the honey in a kettle and heat it until it reaches your desired color, throughout this you need to keep a very close eye on it and stir it often with a long metal spoon. The honey will boil and start to rise, stirring will help keep it down, but sometimes you'll need to reduce the heat until the honey falls.
Once you hit your desired color you'll want to reduce the heat and slowly and carefully add water and let the honey dissolve and simmer *covered* until it is no longer sticking to everything (it will harden when the water is added), simmering it covered will allow the steam to soften the honey sticking to the walls of the kettle.

Thanks, Stout-n-Braggot, I think I will try this in the future. About how much water is necessary?
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Old 03-27-2011, 06:41 PM   #14
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Quick question, should I use S-04 or Windsor yeast for this?

I'm looking for something that won't make this too dry...

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Old 03-27-2011, 10:44 PM   #15
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You might get better flavor if you roast them.
Whenever I roast oats for my stout I do about 1 lb at a time spread over a cookie sheet, roast around 275 or 300 farenheit, and stir them around every 15 or 20 minutes until they darken and begin to smell more burnt than they smell like cookies (they'll start smelling like cookies after only 10 minutes), then I let them sit in a paper bag for at least a week to let some of the acrid aromas volatilize out and then toss them in my mash. For you I would recommend toasting like this and steeping them for an hour or so in about a gallon of water at 180 degrees (much warmer than most steeping grains, but with oats you don't need to worry about tannins, and for this amount it should draw out more of what you want).
Question about tannins: If you steep your grains at a higher temp you would get more tannins in the brew? I usually steep my grains (buckwheat, quinoa, millet etc) around 120-130 F so I would be avoiding extracting the tannins from these grains by steeping at a lower temp?
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Old 03-28-2011, 02:37 AM   #16
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For re-liquifying the carmelized honey you just need to get it to where it can be easily poured, you could even just put in all of the water for the brew once the grains are steeped and add the remaining fermentables if you wanted to (if you carmelize in your brewkettle).

I use whitelabs English Ale yeast for most of my lower gravity stouts, it doesn't attenuate too agressively and the esters it sometimes throws go well with the carmelized honey that I usually add.

As for tannins, they usually come out when grains have spent too much time in water above 180 or so, I rarely worry about them. I wouldn't steep any barley in water that hot due to tannins, but I wouldn't know how it would affect your grains (I haven't ventured much into gluten free brewing yet). My gut tells me that you could steep a fair bit higher than you do, though.
Rolled oats won't contribute tannins because their husks have been removed, and the husk is the usual source of tannins in standard brewing.

Good luck!

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Old 03-28-2011, 04:12 PM   #17
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Quick question, should I use S-04 or Windsor yeast for this?

I'm looking for something that won't make this too dry...
Those two are nearly the same. Both are also similar to his named WLP002.
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Old 03-28-2011, 04:56 PM   #18
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Those two are nearly the same. Both are also similar to his named WLP002.
I've got a packet of each, I'm just wondering if there is a reason to use one over the other for this particular style. I've decided not to use Notty because it has such high attenuation.

If, for example, someone says in their experience windsor tends to leave a slightly higher FG than S-04, I'd use it.

Otherwise, I'll probably use the S-04 just because I know it drops out of suspension well.
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Old 03-28-2011, 04:58 PM   #19
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I've got a packet of each, I'm just wondering if there is a reason to use one over the other for this particular style. I've decided not to use Notty because it has such high attenuation.

If, for example, someone says in their experience windsor tends to leave a slightly higher FG than S-04, I'd use it.

Otherwise, I'll probably use the S-04 just because I know it drops out of suspension well.
I have not noticed any discernable difference when using these yeasts. Notty is a very different yeast that relates more closely with S05.
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Old 06-22-2011, 06:59 PM   #20
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Dorklord, did this stout ever get off the ground?
If so how did it turn out? Any recipe notes?



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