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-   -   Thinkin' 'bout stout... (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f164/thinkin-bout-stout-235042/)

dorklord 03-25-2011 08:41 PM

Thinkin' 'bout stout...
 
So, one of my friends is trying to convince me to make an oatmeal stout. It isn't something I've had...

But I've got some GF rolled oats, and I've got the 'base' ingredients that I need.

So, what I'm wondering is, can I roast some/all of the oats to give it both "oat-ness" and some color/flavor? I'm thinking I can use some dark candi sugar, and perhaps molasses, or even sorghum molasses, to give it some color as well, but I just don't know if I could claim that 3 lbs of Sorghum extract, 3 lbs of dark candi sugar, and a couple spoonfuls of molasses is 'stout'.

So, I'm entertaining something like:
3-4 lbs sorghum extract
1-2? lbs dark candi syrup (home made)
and then with the oats, 1 lb total, with anywhere from 0 to 1 lbs roasted to ?? darkness.

Should I roast half the oats, all the oats? How dark should I try to go?

mrtree 03-25-2011 11:30 PM

Thinkin' about doin a "stout" as well.

My thoughts were along the same lines. Roasting some oats, although I don't think much color will be gained from this. More for the taste. I am thinking the dark color is going to have to come from some coffee and/or blackstrap.

I used the D2 candi sugar in a holiday ale this past winter and it produced a more reddish color. Nothing wrong with that but just a note.

Maltodextrin will be necessary, perhaps in quantities of 10-12 oz.

Not sure what else would help, just some random thoughts.

dorklord 03-26-2011 02:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrtree (Post 2773852)
Thinkin' about doin a "stout" as well.

My thoughts were along the same lines. Roasting some oats, although I don't think much color will be gained from this. More for the taste. I am thinking the dark color is going to have to come from some coffee and/or blackstrap.

I used the D2 candi sugar in a holiday ale this past winter and it produced a more reddish color. Nothing wrong with that but just a note.

Maltodextrin will be necessary, perhaps in quantities of 10-12 oz.

Not sure what else would help, just some random thoughts.

You think that much maltodextrin? I was figuring that the oats were supposed to provide a lot of body/mouthfeel...

Lcasanova 03-26-2011 05:35 AM

I doubt you will get what you are looking for when you mention stout.

WIth all my attempts, I can only get dark brown at best. That's using grains that appear burnt, D2 and a bunch of blackstrap molasses.

Even using BRS over Sorghum wouldn't help. I'm wondering if an all grain recipe with a heavy dose of dark roasted grains is the answer...but how dark, how long to roast those grains...what grain to use, is the real question.

When tax season is over I plan to experiment with quinoa and buckwheat.

Just my 2 cents fellas

Stout-n-Braggot 03-26-2011 05:48 AM

You'll need a source of enzymes to convert the oats, otherwise you won't really get much from them besides an almost chalky mouthfeel from the unconverted starch.
For nice color and complexity you can get 2 lbs of honey and carmelize it until it is almost black (I do this for most of my stouts anymore), it gives nice toffee flavors and when it is slightly burnt it gives a bitterness that is somehwat similar to that of heavily roasted grains and malts. Some carmelized honey and molasses will really add a lot to your recipe.

dorklord 03-26-2011 02:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stout-n-Braggot (Post 2774831)
You'll need a source of enzymes to convert the oats, otherwise you won't really get much from them besides an almost chalky mouthfeel from the unconverted starch.
For nice color and complexity you can get 2 lbs of honey and carmelize it until it is almost black (I do this for most of my stouts anymore), it gives nice toffee flavors and when it is slightly burnt it gives a bitterness that is somehwat similar to that of heavily roasted grains and malts. Some carmelized honey and molasses will really add a lot to your recipe.

Do you think there is a big difference in flavor between caramelized honey and caramelized cane sugar? I was planning on making the cane sugar syrup and caramelizing it myself, but I could use honey (I just don't want to 'waste' honey by burning it if regular sugar will do basically the same thing).

So you think I just forget the oatmeal and go for a regular stout?

I thought I'd seen extract-only oatmeal stout recipes/kits, but maybe they were all doing a mini-mash?

Stout-n-Braggot 03-26-2011 09:49 PM

Many mead makers will carmelize honey to varying degrees for different styles and recipes, it certainly has a different character than plain sugar, but it is difficult to describe, I suppose it could be called a little more tangy.

If you can get ahold of a gluten free source of enzymes then you could still use the oats, but if you can't then I wouldn't include them. You might be able to use a small amount of the oats (I would say about 6 or 8 oz) to get a little bit of the mouthfeel from the starches, but too much and you'll be drinking black chalkwater.

dorklord 03-26-2011 09:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stout-n-Braggot (Post 2776411)
Many mead makers will carmelize honey to varying degrees for different styles and recipes, it certainly has a different character than plain sugar, but it is difficult to describe, I suppose it could be called a little more tangy.

If you can get ahold of a gluten free source of enzymes then you could still use the oats, but if you can't then I wouldn't include them. You might be able to use a small amount of the oats (I would say about 6 or 8 oz) to get a little bit of the mouthfeel from the starches, but too much and you'll be drinking black chalkwater.

Lets say I want to use 6 oz of the oats, should I do anything (cook them, roast them, anything) or just steep them?

Stout-n-Braggot 03-26-2011 10:06 PM

You might get better flavor if you roast them.
Whenever I roast oats for my stout I do about 1 lb at a time spread over a cookie sheet, roast around 275 or 300 farenheit, and stir them around every 15 or 20 minutes until they darken and begin to smell more burnt than they smell like cookies (they'll start smelling like cookies after only 10 minutes), then I let them sit in a paper bag for at least a week to let some of the acrid aromas volatilize out and then toss them in my mash. For you I would recommend toasting like this and steeping them for an hour or so in about a gallon of water at 180 degrees (much warmer than most steeping grains, but with oats you don't need to worry about tannins, and for this amount it should draw out more of what you want).

dorklord 03-26-2011 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stout-n-Braggot (Post 2776457)
You might get better flavor if you roast them.
Whenever I roast oats for my stout I do about 1 lb at a time spread over a cookie sheet, roast around 275 or 300 farenheit, and stir them around every 15 or 20 minutes until they darken and begin to smell more burnt than they smell like cookies (they'll start smelling like cookies after only 10 minutes), then I let them sit in a paper bag for at least a week to let some of the acrid aromas volatilize out and then toss them in my mash. For you I would recommend toasting like this and steeping them for an hour or so in about a gallon of water at 180 degrees (much warmer than most steeping grains, but with oats you don't need to worry about tannins, and for this amount it should draw out more of what you want).

Cool. I've also got some fairly dark roast buckwheat to use for this, so hopefully between that, some molasses, and darkening some candi sugar or honey I'll be able to get the color I desire.


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