Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Sweet Potatoes in Primary...

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-07-2012, 01:21 AM   #11
KevinM
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
Posts: 1,171
Liked 18 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Just a side note from a post a week or two ago. I've tried sorghum and koji-kin as if innoculating rice once so far. I dumped the result. I may have let it go too far though. I'd consider innoculating rice and fermenting the sorghum as the "rice" additions.

Several pdfs relate to enzymes in different sweet potato varieties, as mentioned, so stick with those.

I question the process of malting gf grains, soaking them in potato enzyme rich water and attempting a caramel malt. (This is on my sorghum malt tests scheduled to begin soon.)

__________________

Primary: Sake
Secondary: GF Czech Lager
Waiting to be kegged, Italian Primitivo
Kegged&Ready: GF Orange&Coriander, GF Honey Lager, GF chocolate ale, GF English ale, Island mist (zinfandel), Island mist (cbry malbec).
Bottled: Infected Mead, Dry Hard ciders, Accidental Sorghumwine, various unnamed.

KevinM is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2012, 03:54 PM   #12
Noontime
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Delray Beach, FL
Posts: 196
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I'm curious why so much attention is being paid to the enzymes in sweet potatoes, bananas, etc. Is there any difference between the enzymes found in traditional grains and the store bought amylase powder? I'm finding the discussion informative and very interesting, but I'm obviously coming from a position of ignorance. Would putting in the appropriate amount of enzyme powder with GF ingredients be the same as brewing with traditional grains?

__________________
David Noone
Noontime Custom Labels

www.noontimelabels.com
Noontime is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2012, 05:08 PM   #13
MariposaSouth
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Englewood, CO
Posts: 29
Smile

Hey noontime, thanks for the nice comment (#10)
For the why question, the "amylase formula" I buy at my LHBS is quite mysterious... I can't find anything official about the technical makeup of the formula. I've read from multiple other sources though that it contains alpha and gamma, but no beta. Another potential shortcoming is that limited instructions only mention use in fermentation, not mashing. Whitelabs make an enzyme product called optiMash, for mashing, but it looks like its only available to commercial brewers.
So the goal is to make the mash more like a traditional barley mash, with both alpha and beta; and if we can do it naturally w/o adding a powder, that would be even more cool
KevinM - which "post a week or two ago" are you referring to? I'll watch for your crystal-sorghum malt tests... Sounds very interesting. I've found good instructions in the past for crystallizing barley malt, I'll see if I can find it again and post the link...

__________________
MariposaSouth is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2012, 06:20 PM   #14
KevinM
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
Posts: 1,171
Liked 18 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

It was a post asking about using Koji. I'd have to dig through the last page when I have time.

While I've seen reports of alpha/beta amylase amounts of sorghum, I don't know the quantity listed in other GF grains. They can malt, but the result isn't great. (incomplete conversion). However, some varieties of sweet potatoes and yams can increase this sugar by 6x because of the amount of beta amylase in the variety. And the powder tends to be fungi based and generally alpha.

Yeah, the problem I have about crystallizing malt is which enzymes are involved. (generally pale barley malt that only has been dried/kilned is soaked then heated to have the enzymes make sugar and the heat caramelizes this). If I don't need the extra beta, then I might be able to do that portion without the sweet potato, but I'll be testing that then posting all my tests. I'm writing all the variables of the test now. I still expect the use of the sweet potato during the multi-decoction mash.

__________________

Primary: Sake
Secondary: GF Czech Lager
Waiting to be kegged, Italian Primitivo
Kegged&Ready: GF Orange&Coriander, GF Honey Lager, GF chocolate ale, GF English ale, Island mist (zinfandel), Island mist (cbry malbec).
Bottled: Infected Mead, Dry Hard ciders, Accidental Sorghumwine, various unnamed.

KevinM is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2012, 12:50 PM   #15
bouquets
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Newyork city, New York
Posts: 5
Default

I agree with you, i have also the same problem which you have..!

__________________
bouquet gifts
bouquets is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
sweet potato mash experiment bonsai4tim Gluten Free Brewing 50 09-14-2013 04:23 PM
All grain GF sweet vanilla stout mcbethenstein Gluten Free Brewing 20 05-01-2011 06:31 PM
Sweet Potatoes, Amylase Enzymes, and a Lot of Interesting Possibilites JumboBlimpJumbo Gluten Free Brewing 16 03-03-2011 03:52 PM